Emeritus Academy

The continued research, scholarship and creative activity of emeritus faculty members are essential to Ohio State’s mission of creating and discovering knowledge to improve the world. The Emeritus Academy was established in 2014 to support their work and to enhance the social and professional life of the emeritus community.

The mission of the Emeritus Academy is to recognize and promote the ongoing engagement of emeritus faculty in research and in scholarly and creative activity for the enhanced reputation of the university and for the benefit of society at large by:

  • Helping to support scholarly activities through small research and travel grants
  • Promoting a sense of community among Academy members
  • Working appropriately with other units across the university

The Emeritus Academy fosters active scholarship among its members and promotes the concept of lifetime scholars, which benefits its members, The Ohio State University, and the various communities with which they interact. For more information about the Emeritus Academy contact emeritusacademy@osu.edu.

Emeritus Academy Lecture Series

The Emeritus Academy hosts a monthly lecture series in which members discuss their current research and creative activities. Lectures are free and open to the public, occurring at 4 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month during the academic year, and generally held in the Grand Lounge of the Faculty Club.

Gary G. Berntson, Psychology

October 4, 2017

4 - 5 p.m.

Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

"Non-invasive Brain Stimulation in Medicine, Athletics, Gaming and the Military"

Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation this has been cleared by the USDA for the treatment of a number of psychiatric conditions, including depression, anxiety disorders and  other conditions. But this type of brain stimulation is not limited to the medical domain. It is increasingly being used by video “gamers” in an attempt to increase their competitive edge. Moreover, we are seeing increasing use in athletes for performance enhancement.  The present talk will be an adaptation of a joint invited address to the USADA (US Anti-D0png Agency, which deals with drug doping in the Olympics) and SMRTL (Sports Medicine Research and Testing Laboratories, which does the drug testing for the NFL and other professional teams). These agencies are concerned as to whether this practice constitutes “doping.” Potential applications extend even beyond this. The Department of Defense has contracted for studies of whether such non-invasive brain stimulation can enhance performance of combatants. The present talk will highlight developments in this area and prospects for the future.  

Joseph Donnermeyer, Environment and Natural Resources

November 1, 2017

4 - 5 p.m.

Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

"Understanding the Amish: Persistence and Change"

Learning about the Amish by watching a TV reality show about them is akin to claiming one is a Veterinarian (or alternatively, an entomologist) after viewing a full-length cartoon version of Charlotte’s Web. This lecture will guide the audience on a journey from the outer to the inner characteristics of the real Amish, who today represent one of the fastest growing religious groups in US society.

Anna Soter, Teaching and Learning

December 6, 2017

4 - 5 p.m.

Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

"Birthing the Hospital Poets: Enacting the Kinesthetic and Creative Healing Power of Poetry in Medical Settings"

Poets could be described as musicians who use the sounds of language as their notation system. Listeners (and tuned-in readers) of poetry pick up on the poet's sense· of sound through the ways in which the words of the poems reflect the poet’s ideas and concepts as well as the poet's. attitudes toward the subject matter. It is this peculiar power of poetry to reach into the body and heart, as well as the mind, that drove my decision, in 2010, to explore the possibility of bringing it into hospital settings, not so much for patients, as for staff at all levels. Increasingly admitted in medical research is the highly stressful nature of the medical profession at all levels – whether those professionals are physicians, medical administrators, medical specialists, nurses, medical researchers, medical technicians and all ancillary hospital staff. There is concern that more medical professionals are experiencing burn-out, facing more responsibility in decision-making, and increased challenges in dealing with ethical conflicts, and increased workloads. In the US, the Humanism in Medicine movement recognizes that high levels of stress not only negatively affect performance, but also the quality of patient care. It therefore embraces the role of the Arts in having a positive effect on medical personnel and practice. In my talk, I’ll focus on the birth of the Hospital Poets at OSU and contextualize that in a brief account of the history and nature of “poetry therapy” as it has evolved in the US.

William Ausich, Earth Sciences

February 7, 2018

4 - 5 p.m.

Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

"Biosphere Collapse and Recovery: Lessons from the Fossil Record"

Earth is in the midst of a biodiversity crisis with extinctions occurring at an alarmingly high rate. However, this is not unique, as major mass extinctions have occurred through the evolutionary history of life on Earth. One avenue of research to address the present-day crisis is to study ancient extinctions and faunal recoveries to help understand their causes and to help reduce the severity of biodiversity crises. The causes of ancient mass extinctions and recoveries are explored using the fossil record of the Crinoidea (sea lilies and feather stars, phylum Echinodermata) marine organisms that dominated ocean floor communities during much of Earth history.

Charles Klopp, French and Italian

March 7, 2018

4 - 5 p.m.

Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

"Language and Dialects in Italy: How Poets Choose"

What’s the difference between a language and a dialect? And if a language is spoken by more people than a dialect, why would anyone—a poet, for example—choose to write in a dialect rather than a language? This lecture will propose some answers to these questions with examples from poetry written in the dialect of Trieste. Though today a part of Italy and culturally Italian for centuries, Trieste was politically and administratively Austrian from as early as 1382 until the end of the First World War. A city that has been proud of its polyglot and multiethnic culture, Trieste has nurtured poets and writers in several languages, among them Virgilio Giotti and Claudio Grisancich, excerpts from whose works will be read in the original Triestine with translations provided into English. 

Mary Jo Fresch, Teaching and Learning

April 4, 2018

4 - 5 p.m.

Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

"The Importance of Study Abroad: Students Outside Their Comfort Zones"

Study abroad opportunities are on the rise at institutions of higher education. The intent of such programs is to provide students with international experiences tied to their major fields of study. This presentation describes the shifts in attitudes of Ohio State pre-service teachers in a one-month home stay while teaching in a bi-lingual school in Concepción, Chile. It examines changing views about family structures, education, and being the outsider in a culture. Study abroad can be life changing as it takes students away from their usual supports and out of their comfort zones.

 

Jackie Wood, Physiology and Cell Biology

May 2, 2018

4 - 5 p.m.

Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

"Second Brain in the Gut"

I coined the now universally accepted term, brain-in-the-gut, for the enteric nervous system in a review published in the 1981 issue of the Annual Review of Physiology [1]. This was in view of discoveries in my laboratory and others that the main physiological processes in the digestive tract are controlled by an independent integrative nervous system with neural circuitry containing about 100 million neurons, all within the walls of the gut. Neuronal electrical behavior and synaptic neurotransmission in the microcircuits of the second brain are essentially the same as in the “big brain”. The microcircuits in the second brain contain a library of neural programs (think I-phone, I-pad apps) that determine behavior in specialized states including postprandial, interdigestive, emesis and defense against threatening invasions from the outside. My mantra to medical students over 45 years continues to be; “understanding how a system works normally is prerequisite for determination of what is wrong, making a diagnosis and formulating a rational therapeutic plan”.  My talk will explain how the brain-in-the-gut is involved in the pathophysiology of several disorders, such as the irritable bowel syndrome, Hirschsprung Disease, food allergies, enteric infections, constipation, diarrhea, psychogenic stress and opioid drug effects.

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