2016-17 Emeritus Academy Lecture Series

The 2016-17 Emeritus Academy Lecture Series events include a distinguished list of speakers. Meetings are held at 4 p.m. on the first Wednesday of every month during the academic year with the exception of January. See the complete schedule below.

September 7, 2016

Lois Rosow, Music
"Unlocking the Secrets of an Old Music Book"

4-5 p.m. • Business meeting to follow
Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

Jean-Baptiste Lully (1632-1687), Louis XIV's favorite musician, is credited with several "firsts": he invented French opera, he introduced orchestral discipline, and he was the first in France to publish folio full scores. The first editions of his operas—luxury prints dedicated to the king of France—are generally understood as products of absolute monarchy: displays of magnificence meant to reflect the king's glory. A corollary of this idea is that they were perhaps less practical than other means of disseminating music. A close study of these books as material objects, along with the historical context for their creation, reveals a richer, more nuanced picture of Lully's concerns and those of his printer, Christophe Ballard. This lecture will focus in particular on the edition of Lully's final masterpiece, the opera Armide (1686).

October 5, 2016

John Hughes, Cancer Biology and Genetics
"Healthcare-Associated Infections:  A Personal and Public Healthcare Tragedy"

4-5 p.m. • Business meeting to follow
Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

The bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile (C. diff.) can be carried by humans and animals. C. diff. infections are often acquired in hospitals and in long-term care facilities. Risk factors associated with C. diff. infections will be addressed in order to enable healthy decision making. If hospitalization and/or long-term care may be in your future, come learn about the risk factors for the number one cause of healthcare infections.

November 2, 2016

Donald Haurin, Economics
"Reverse Mortgages: What, Who, Why, and When"

4-5 p.m. • Business meeting to follow
Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

There are a large number of seniors with substantial home equity, but relatively little income. They could tap their home equity by moving to a rental unit or less expensive dwelling, but many wish to remain in their current home. For some seniors, traditional access to the credit market through refinancing or a home equity loan is unavailable due to lenders’ credit constraints. Financial planners are increasingly suggesting retirement planning strategies where reverse mortgages have a role. This talk summarizes four years of research on the U.S. Home Equity Conversion Mortgage. Topics covered include a description of reverse mortgages, who obtains them and the reasons for this decision, and the longer-term outcomes of obtaining a reverse mortgage.

December 7, 2016

Richard Gunther, Political Science
"The Politics of Redistricting Reform: Theory and Practice"

4-5 p.m. • Business meeting to follow
Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

What does the transition to democracy in Spain have to do with gerrymandering in Ohio? Richard Gunther began his research career studying politics in Spain, the centerpiece of which was its successful transition to democracy in the late 1970s. "The Spanish Model" of elite bargaining was subsequently applied by other scholars to their studies of the dynamics of political change in other countries.

Three decades later, Gunther was himself a participant in negotiations over political reform, in this case, efforts to eliminate the gerrymandering of legislative districts in  Ohio. To a striking degree, he found that "The Spanish Model" provided powerful insights into the failure (especially the "near miss" in 2010) and success (the passage of Issue 1 in 2014) of these redistricting reform efforts. In this talk, Gunther will analyze these processes of political change, as well as present an update on the prospects for reform of congressional redistricting currently under consideration (in which he is, again, a participant in negotiations).

February 1, 2017

Julia Watson, Comparative Studies
"Getting a Digital Life: Self-Presentation Online"

4-5 p.m. • Business meeting to follow
Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

Formerly people kept diaries and journals, or wrote—in forms from letters to memoirs—in order to reflect on their lives. How have practices of self-reflection and the presentation of self-changed with the advent of digital media? Shifts in key concepts, such as archives, memory, identity, authenticity, branding, and quantification, make clear that what formerly was called the individual “self” is now a distributed subjectivity across multiple relationships and ideologies. How does the explosion of virtual “I”’s reshape familiar concepts about the self? What issues does the proliferation of online “selves” raise? In what ways do digital environments, which situate subjects as assemblages of surfaces, networks, archives, nodes, and avatars, blur the boundaries of individual lives and “remix” aspects of multiple persons? What consequences of online self-presentation ensue for us as “users”?

March 1, 2017

Morris Beja, English
"Fear and Desire in the Films of Stanley Kubrick"

4-5 p.m. • Business meeting to follow
Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

This lecture will span the entire career of one of the most honored—and controversial—directors in the history of film. Of course Kubrick made such films as Dr. Strangelove, 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket, and Eyes Wide Shut. The talk will center on the relationship between love and death in his movies—what the title of his first almost unknown film calls Fear and Desire. Kubrick connects love—and sex—with death, or at least with the fear of death, and with fear and violence more generally. Clips will be shown from all the movies discussed.

May 3, 2017

Daniel Christie, Psychology
"The Power of Humanizing and Dehumanizing the Other"

4-5 p.m. • Business meeting to follow
Grand Lounge, Faculty Club

Dehumanization is a pervasive phenomenon with profound implications for peace and human well-being. The consensus that some human qualities are unique or essential to what constitutes a human being and the denial of these qualities to certain categories of people has been implicated in violence within and across multiple levels of analysis, from interpersonal to international. Less attention has been given to the process of humanizing the Other though the arc of history might suggest the conferral of essential and unique human qualities to the Other is just as pervasive as denial. This lecture will offer a balanced perspective on humanization and dehumanization and highlight the dynamic feature of these processes. Using a psychosocial lens and drawing on research that colleagues are conducting in a number of countries, I will discuss the utility and subtlety of humanizing and dehumanizing processes and how they vary across geohistorical contexts.