Connect and Collaborate Grants Program - Autumn 2016 Recipients

Connect and Collaborate Grants Program - Autumn 2016 Recipients

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The Connect and Collaborate Grants Program is designed to bring together multiple, available university and community resources and leverage existing community platforms to develop programs that achieve measurable, positive impacts in communities while advancing the scholarly goals of the university. Below are the Autumn 2016 grant recipients.


CNS Cancers in Sao Paulo

Central nervous system (CNS) cancers represent the major cause of both cancer and disease-related death in the developed world in children between 1 and 18 years of age. We have made significant progress in the United States, however, for countries in South America, survival and quality of survival outcomes still lag behind. The management of children with CNS cancers demands close collaboration between pediatric oncologists specifically trained in CNS tumors (neuro-oncologists), pediatric neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, pediatric neuro-pathologists and other specialists; without such intimate cooperation, misdiagnoses, delays in initiation of appropriate therapy, and the age-appropriate selection of therapies become sub-optimal, as is seen widely throughout South America. Our colleagues from IPO/UniFeSP-GRAAC Children's Cancer Hospital in Sao Paulo, Brazil reached out to us in 2014 to develop more formal and structured multi-disciplinary collaborations to overcome their challenges.

The program seeks to establish the following initiatives during the next two years:

  1. Conduct a second Pediatric Latin American Neuro-oncology conference in 2017 in Sao Paulo, Brazil attended by pertinent pediatric sub-specialists from South America;
  2. Formalize educational visits for residents/fellows from IPO/UniFeSP-GRAAC to OSU/Nationwide Children's Hospital for advanced training;
  3. Establish multi-disciplinary, real-time teleconferencing of challenging pediatric CNS tumors;
  4. Enhance their neuropathology infrastructure and expertise through educational interactions and training with our neuropathologists;
  5. Include advanced molecular profiling at OSU in the Chakravarti/Bell lab for pediatric medulloblastoma tissues; and
  6. Provide an educational experience for an OSU medical or pre-medical student to undertake a global health field project in pediatric neuro-oncology in Sao Paulo.

Team Leads:
Jonathan Finlay, College of Medicine
Diana S. Osorio, College of Medicine

Ohio State Partners:
College of Medicine

External Partners:
Nationwide Children's Hospital

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
Global Gateways (Office of International Affairs)
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Columbus Community Teaching and Learning Consortium (CTLC): Supporting Parent-Teacher Engagement in Schools through a Research-Practice Partnership

This grant will support us in developing and delivering a Place-Based Family Involvement course with parents from our CTLC partner schools. We know that family involvement in children's education is a significant factor in their subsequent school success. Despite these benefits, barriers exist to building strong school-family-community partnerships. Parents may not engage actively because of work and family commitments and educators may feel unable or unprepared to engage with families. To better understand and overcome these barriers, this course will focus on telling and revising stories about family involvement in schools.

A key innovative feature of the course is the integration of technology through digital storytelling. Parents will co-lead and -design the course and all participants will create digital stories to accomplish both course-specific outcomes and long-term, generative and sustainable outcomes. Often, we carry stories about one another that are shaped by our past experiences in different places and spaces at different times. Sometimes we carry single, stereotypical stories about one another based on language, race, ethnicity, class or myriad other factors. And sometimes these single stories limit our opportunities to learn from and teach one another. Through this course, we will work together to ask questions, tell our own stories, collect other people's stories, and create new stories that may help us to better support K-8 students in schools. Ultimately, we will each create a short, video story based on our reading, writing, inquiry, and discussions. Our time together will end with a Family Involvement Film Festival in April.

Team Lead:
Caroline Clark, College of Education and Human Ecology

Ohio State Partners:
College of Education and Human Ecology/Department of Teaching and Learning

External Partners:
Columbus City Schools
The Graham Family of Schools
Highland Elementary School

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
The Columbus Foundation
Office of Service-Learning
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Community Garden Leadership Initiative

Community gardens serve many purposes in our communities, such as providing an area to grow fresh produce for those that do not have space where they live, serving as community meeting areas, and providing the opportunity for physical activity. However, community gardens often fail due to lack of leadership, community buy-in, and lack of participant knowledge, which are too often ignored in the planning and development stage. While Extension doesn't currently have the capacity to initiate and manage community gardens, Extension can play a vital role in providing education, technical support, and leadership development training in order to empower community garden leaders to maintain and sustain community gardens as important assets in neighborhoods.

This project will offer leadership training and support to community garden leaders who currently manage or are interested in developing a community garden and develop local networks in order to increase sustainability and long-term success of community gardens in Ohio. A six-week training course will piloted in several counties (Franklin, Stark, and Summit) and a Stark-Summit community garden network will be formed. A Master Gardener Volunteer Community Garden Mentor specialization will also be developed and offered to counties that maintain a MGV program. The long-term goal of this project is to sustain community garden and food projects throughout Ohio via community engagement, leadership training, and volunteer involvement and increase the amount of fresh produce grown by these projects.

Team Lead:
Jacqueline Kowalski, OSU Extension

Ohio State Partners:
OSU Extension

External Partners:
Let's Grow Akron

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
OSU Extension
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Connecting Climate and People to Improve Outcomes for Ohio and Beyond

A significant amount of meteorological and climatological data is publically available, but it is neither tailored to the needs of public and private stakeholders nor available on an intuitive and applicable platform for resource managers, producers and policy makers to utilize effectively. Serving as data stewards, it is the mission of the State Climate Office of Ohio to connect Ohioans with weather and climate information necessary to improve lives. This collaborative endeavor will lead to a multi-platform prototype tool consisting of the "FARM" (Fertilizer Application and Resource Monitor) mobile and web app and climate database. This tool will provide farmers in the Western Lake Erie Basin with the real-time weather and climate information needed to make compliance decisions concerning fertilizer and manure application.

An important facet to the FARM app will be the ability for farmers to elect to have notifications "pushed" to their mobile device(s), providing up-to-date information at their location and time of need. The development of this tool will also lead to a robust database of weather and climate information needed for compliance. In addition to being available on smart-phones and tablets, the app will have an accompanying website for use on personal computers. Our second venture is to forge a new multidisciplinary research initiative within the OSU community and upper Ohio River region to compete for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) grant. This consortium will develop and integrate climate data and inform resource management and public policy throughout the Midwest.

Team Lead:
Bryan Mark, College of Arts and Sciences / Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center

Ohio State Partners:
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences
OSU Extension
Office of Energy and Environment

External Partners:
weatherUSA, LLC

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
OSU Extension
Office of Energy and Environment
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Connecting the Dots to Economic and Cultural Revitalization in Fayette County, Ohio

Connecting the Dots to Economic and Cultural Revitalization in Fayette County, Ohio will use community engagement interventions with various art practices to investigate the local culture of Washington Court House and other villages in Fayette County. This planning process will bring together multiple partners from Fayette County and Ohio State to design opportunities and interventions (such as storytelling, interviews, community discussion forums, brainstorming sessions, and art making) that will lead towards sustainable economic revitalization efforts.

It is our intention that this project will result in a customized and scalable process that will enable Fayette County towns and villages to stimulate economic development using art and culture as a foundational intervention in rural areas to improve quality of life and well-being. Specifically, this project is designed to serve rural Ohioans in Washington Court House, Bloomingburg and Jeffersonville in Fayette County. In joining colleagues from around the country (including Cooperative Extension Offices from the Universities of Illinois, Kentucky and Wisconsin, Oregon and Iowa State Universities, Imagining America's Extension Reconsidered, and, most recently, the Kettering Foundation's Rural Issue Guide) to explore rural economic development, collaborators are looking for best practices that incorporate art and culture interventions in economic revitalization efforts in rural American towns and counties.

Program website: http://www.barnettcenter.osu.edu/programs/think-tank/spring-2016-washington-courthouse-oh

Team Leads:
Sonia BasSheva Manjon, College of Arts and Sciences
Godwin Tayese Apaliyah, Director, Fayette County Economic Development & Ohio State Community Development Extension Educator, Fayette County

Ohio State Partners:
College of Arts and Sciences/Barnett Center
College of Arts and Sciences/Center for Folklore Studies
College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences
University Extension Community Development

External Partners:
Fayette County Travel and Tourism
City of Washington Court House/Main Street Group
Fayette County Commission
Bloomingburg Mayor's Office
Jeffersonville Mayor's Office
Fayette County Public Library
Fayette County Historical Society and Museum
Fayette County Economic Development
Fayette County Geographical Information System
The Print Shop, Record Herald Newspaper
White Fence Gallery
Creative Courthouse
Anima Viva Arts
Miami Trace School

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
OSU Extension
Office of Service-Learning
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Costs and Benefits of Human-Animal Interactions for Rural Children

Are animals the solution to improving health in rural children? In developing countries, livestock are a source of income and nutrition that can improve food security and opportunities for households and children within them. However, diarrheal disease is the second leading cause of infant mortality in developing countries worldwide and is often zoonotic in origin, or transmitted between humans and animals. So how do the costs and benefits of human-animal interaction compare and do they vary cross-culturally? With a better understanding of the complex interplay between the costs and benefits of different interactions with different species in different settings, local and international development organizations and health-care providers could provide recommendations on the most beneficial use of animals within a particular culture and context to improve the lives and health of rural children. Through a collaborative partnership between The Ohio State University and the Autonomous National University of Nicaragua in León, we will develop tools to study this issue and put our findings into practice in rural populations around the world.

Team Leads:
Rebecca Garabed, College of Veterinary Medicine
Jiyoung Lee, College of Public Health
Barbara Piperata, College of Arts and Sciences

OSU Partners:
College of Veterinary Medicine - Department of Veterinary Preventive Medicine
College of Arts and Sciences - Department of Anthropology
College of Public Health - Division of Environmental Health Sciences
College of Nursing

External Partners:
Center for Demography and Health (CIDS) at the Autonomous National University of Nicaragua in León (UNAN-León)

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
Infectious Diseases Discovery Theme
Global One Health
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Expand Experiential Learning Opportunities in Columbus City Schools through the GEM Program

Team Lead:
Patty Cunningham, Office of Student Life (Social Change)

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
Office of Service-Learning
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Generation Rx: Promoting Safe Medication Practices for Life

Prescription medications are among the most misused substances in the United States, and this phenomenon has resulted in myriad health, social, fiscal and legal consequences. For example, drug overdose is our country's leading cause of accidental death, and Ohio now leads the nation in the number of these deaths. Generation Rx is a medication safety initiative established by The Ohio State University College of Pharmacy and the Cardinal Health Foundation to help address this phenomenon. This Connect and Collaborate Grant proof-of-concept project creates a new vision for a partnership between Generation Rx, OSU Extension, and the Kroger Company. We believe that it will engender long-term and sustainable relationships that will benefit the people of Ohio and beyond through activities to promote "safe medication practices for life."

Our initial efforts will focus on combating the opioid epidemic, which is one of Ohio's (and America's) most pressing public health concerns, using a two-pronged approach. First, the Opioid Patient Education Program will engage Kroger pharmacists in patient education activities when opioid medications are dispensed. Secondly, support will be provided in K-12 schools through OSU Extension for opioid safety instruction. These efforts will begin in Southeast Ohio to assess impact, plan for programmatic expansion, and establish a framework for addressing other medication safety issues moving forward. Ultimately, these relationships will take different forms to address the many medication-related issues that impact the drug-taking culture in which we live. The project will begin in January 2017 and conclude in December 2018.

Program website: www.GenerationRx.org

Team Leads: 
Kenneth Hale, College of Pharmacy
Nicole Kwiek, College of Pharmacy

Ohio State Partners:
College of Pharmacy
OSU Extension

External Partners:
Cardinal Health Foundation
Kroger Pharmacy

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
OSU Extension
Office of Outreach and Engagement


LiFEsports Youth Leadership Academy: Helping Underserved Youth Be College and Career Ready

LiFEsports is a comprehensive youth development Initiative at The Ohio State University serving over 600 youth ages 9‐18 annually through its flagship summer camp, year-round sports clinics, and the Youth Leadership Academy (YLA). The Initiative targets programming to reach vulnerable youth in the Columbus community, as over 80% of youth live in households at or below 200% of the poverty line. With the support of the Connect and Collaborate Planning Grant, the LiFEsports Initiative will focus efforts on improving the sustainability of the LiFEsports YLA. First developed in 2013, the YLA is designed to serve LiFEsports youth who have aged out of traditional summer camp programming.

The YLA promotes college and career readiness by engaging high school youth in year‐round programming focused on building financial literacy, enhancing leadership skills, promoting college access, and fostering 21st-century skills. The YLA strives to support youth in enrolling in post-secondary education upon completion of high school. In 2016-17, 50 high school youth are enrolled in the YLA. Over the next two years, LiFEsports hopes to grow this program to serve 75 youth and provide more extensive programming. Through this planning grant, LiFEsports will begin a collaborative planning process with its community and University partners to determine effective avenues and opportunities to support LiFEsports in developing and maintaining the infrastructure necessary for the YLA and the LiFEsports Initiative at large. By increasing the sustainability of the YLA, the LiFEsports Initiative and its partners hope to continue to impact the lives of vulnerable youth in the Columbus community.

Program website: http://www.osulifesports.org/parents-families/youth-leadership-program

Team Lead:
Dawn Anderson-Butcher, College of Social Work

Ohio State Partners:
College of Social Work
Department of Athletics
Office of Student Life, Recreational Sports
OSU Extension
The Sports and Society Initiative
Undergraduate Research Office

External Partners:
Huntington National Bank
Columbus City Schools
Camp Mary Orton

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
OSU Extension
Office of Outreach and Engagement


Pay as You Can: Restaurant, Marketplace, and Meal Delivery Service to Increase Access to Healthy Food in Marion, Ohio

Food insecurity is a persistent problem with staggering health implications. Over 14,000 Marion County residents (15.9%) are food insecure; the childhood food insecurity rate is 25.7%. Without affordable nutrition, Marion county families are forced to choose between food quantity and quality lending to untoward health outcomes: 32% of adults are obese; 47% of third graders have BMIs of 25 or greater (> 95th percentile). The objective of our project is to develop a replicable and sustainable model that can be instituted locally to address the food insecurity crisis. We will create a comprehensive plan for the development, implementation, and evaluation of a pay-as-you can restaurant, marketplace, and meal delivery service to be located in a renovated facility in downtown Marion, Ohio.

Unlike other food access options, the downtown location is accessible by public transportation to those most in need. Other social service and education providers will be recruited to occupy space and share services. The benefits of the project are far-reaching. Statewide and nationally, the project and its learnings will further development of this proof of concept for possible replication. This includes development of strong evaluation methods that can be offered as a service to new or existing initiatives. Once constructed, the restaurant and marketplace can contribute to improved health of adult patrons, including increased consumption of fruit and vegetables. The economy will be strengthened from greater commerce, added jobs, on-site employment training, and the drawdown of federal USDA cash reimbursements for meals catered to surrounding Head Start programs.

Team Leads:
Gail L. Kaye, College of Public Health
Whitney Gherman, Marion City Schools
Winnie Brewer, Marion City Schools

Ohio State Partners:
OSU Extension
Ohio State Marion
College of Public Health

External Partners:
Marion City Schools

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
OSU Extension
Office of Outreach and Engagement


The Ohio Land Exchange (OH/LEX) Program

The Ohio Land Exchange (OH/LEX) program seeks to connect city and county land banks to the resources of The Ohio State University and its Extension educators. In Ohio, more than 20 cities with a population over 20,000 have seen significant declines in population, land use and economic activity over the last 30 years, making them "shrinking" or "legacy" cities (Greater Ohio Policy Center, 2016). In 2015, an Impact Grant from the Office of Outreach and Engagement funded the OH/LEX pilot-project in Lima, Ohio. This initial effort produced new forms of data on vacant land in Lima and advanced innovative approaches to engage stakeholders and highlight potential forms of vacant land reuse through the development of arts-based events and displays.

The OH/LEX program expands this approach by engaging city, county land bank and OSU Extension staff throughout the state to implement sophisticated social, technical and environmental strategies for the (re-)use of vacant land, especially in small- and mid-sized legacy cities. The OH/LEX team will organize a series of workshops for Extension and land bank staff to familiarize them with this new approach. In addition, the Center for Urban and Regional Analysis will assist with the development of an online portal that enables easy access to information about vacant and abandoned land. The goal of these two activities is to enable OSU Extension staff to deliver the OH/LEX approach to interested jurisdictions, supported by faculty and staff at Ohio State's Knowlton School of Architecture, School of Environment and Natural Resources and Center for Urban and Regional Analysis.

Team Lead:
Tijs Van Maasakkers, Knowlton School

Ohio State Partners:
Knowlton School - City and Regional Planning
Knowlton School - Landscape Architecture
School of Environment and Natural Resources
OSU Extension
Center for Urban and Regional Analysis
Lima Campus

External Partners:
City of Lima – Department of Community Development
Allen County Land Bank
Downing Community Advisors

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
OSU Extension
Office of Outreach and Engagement


OSU and South Africa Collaborate to Fight Superbugs

There are 700,000 annual deaths worldwide attributable to infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens called 'superbugs" and if left unchecked will increase to 10 million by 2050. The world has overused, misused, and abused antibiotics in humans, animals, and agriculture. Human health takes the spotlight with superbugs now highly prevalent in common infections. Almost 50% of antibiotics prescribed in hospitals are unnecessary. Every unnecessary dose of antibiotics contributes to the escalating rate of superbugs. To improve the health of people, animals, and the environment we need a scalable and proven solution that can be implemented on a global basis. The United Nations issued a call to action for countries to implement antibiotic stewardship programs to address the spread of superbugs and overuse of antibiotics. In South Africa, a shortage of trained pharmacists in infectious diseases creates a challenge. OSU and South Africa implemented a train-the-trainer antibiotic stewardship pharmacist mentoring program in 2014. The six South African mentored pharmacists trained an additional 47 pharmacists. The results, published in Lancet Infectious Diseases show how pharmacists decreased antibiotic use in 47 hospitals across South Africa by 18%. The planning grant will assist in identifying sources to scale up the existing program and to answer key scalability questions.

Team Leads:
Debra Goff, College of Pharmacy
Julie Mangino, College of Medicine

Ohio State Partners:
College of Pharmacy
College of Medicine
Discovery Themes Infectious Diseases
Fisher College of Business

External Partners:
University of Cape Town Groote Schuur Hospital
Ampath National Lab
Netcare Hospitals Ltd
Sefako Makgatho University

Connect and Collaborate Funders:
Infectious Diseases Discovery Theme
Office of Outreach and Engagement

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