Mission and Members

Mission Statement

The stated mission of the Emeritus Academy is to recognize and promote the ongoing engagement of emeritus faculty in research and in scholarly and creative activity for the enhanced reputation of the university and for the benefit of society at large by

  • Helping to support scholarly activities through small research and travel grants
  • Promoting a sense of community among Academy members
  • Working appropriately with other units across the university

The Emeritus Academy fosters active scholarship among its members and promotes the concept of lifetime scholars, which benefits its members, The Ohio State University, and the various communities with which they interact.

Who We Are

The President and Provost’s Advisory Council brought together a group of dedicated faculty who volunteered to serve as the inaugural members of a Founding Council for the Emeritus Academy. This council (Liang-Shih Fan, Robert C. Holub, Brian D. Joseph, Joan R. Leitzel, Terry A. Miller) shaped the Emeritus Academy, which was founded in the 2014-15 academic year. The Emeritus Academy is now guided by a Steering Committee:

  • Terry A. Miller, Ohio Eminent Scholar Professor Emeritus, Chair
    Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbus campus
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    Terry A. Miller

    Terry Miller obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry from the University of Kansas. After receiving his Ph.D. from Cambridge University on a Marshall Scholarship, he went to Bell Laboratories where he became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff. Thereafter he moved to The Ohio State University as the first Ohio Eminent Scholar Professor. He has held visiting faculty appointments at Princeton University, Stanford University, and the Institute for Molecular Science in Japan. Dr. Miller's research centers on the spectroscopic identification, characterization and monitoring of reactive and/or trace chemical species.  He has developed numerous highly sensitive, spectroscopic techniques spanning frequencies from the microwave to the ultraviolet.  Presently, his work focuses upon laser induced fluorescence and cavity ringdown spectroscopy of reactive intermediates. These intermediates play critical roles in a variety of processes of interest to our society and economy, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and plasma processing of electronic devices. The spectra of these species serve as key diagnostics to monitor their chemical reactions and characterize their geometric and electronic structures. He is author of more than 350 scientific publications. His research has been recognized with the Meggars Award (Optical Society of America), the Bomem-Michaelson Award (Coblentz Society), the Bourke Medal (Royal Society of Chemistry), the Broida Prize and Plyler Prize (American Physical Society), the Morley Prize (Cleveland Section of the American Chemical Society) and the Ioannes Marcus Marci Medal (Czechoslavak Spectroscopic Society). He has been granted the recognition of Fellow by the American Chemical Society, American Physical Society, Optical Society of America and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He presently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy and for 22 years was Chair of the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy which annually attracts approximately 500 conferees. He sits on several other journal editorial boards and conference program committees, and currently chairs the Advisory Committee for the International Free Radicals Symposium.

    Email: miller.104@osu.edu

  • Rolf F. Barth, Professor Emeritus
    Pathology, Columbus campus
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    Rolf F. Barth

    I obtained my undergraduate degree from Cornell University and my medical degree from the College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University. Following this I did an internship in Surgery at Columbia University Medical Center, followed by a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. This was followed by additional training in Immunology and Pathology at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. From there I joined the Department of Pathology and Oncology at the University of Kansas Medical, progressing from an Assistant to full Professor in six years. I joined the OSU Department of Pathology in 1979 as Professor and transitioned to Emeritus status in 2013.

    I have been involved in cancer research for the past 35 years. The pri­mary focus of my research has been in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of malignant gliomas, one of the most malignant of human cancers. BNCT is a noninvasive therapeutic modality for treating locally invasive malignant tumors such as primary brain tumors and recurrent head and neck cancer. It is a two-step procedure: first, the patient is injected with a non-radioactive tumor localizing boron-10–containing drug that has a high propensity to capture slow neutrons. The cross section of the boron-10 is one to two thousand times greater than that of the other elements normally present in tissues. In the second step, the patient is radiated with epithermal neutrons, which after losing energy as they penetrate tissue, are absorbed by the boron-10, which subsequently emits high-energy radiation, resulting in a biologically destructive nuclear reaction. I have utilized my training in tumor immu­nol­ogy to focus on the use of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), directed against specific molecular targets such as the epi­dermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as boron delivery agents for BNCT to treat malignant brain tumors using a rat brain tumor model. Another component of my BNCT research has focused on the evaluation of low molecular weight boron compounds and opti­mization of their delivery for the treatment of brain tumors. A new area of research over the past 8 years has focused on another chemoradiothera­peutic approach for the treatment of brain tumors that combines administration of the anti-cancer drugs carboplatin or cisplatin directly to the site of the brain tumor com­bined with radiotherapy. This research has been funded by a variety of sources, including the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, the Department of Energy, and numerous private foundations. In addition to the research described above, I have had clinical responsibilities as a Pathologist on the Autopsy Service.

    Over the course of my academic career I have mentored numerous Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows, but unquestionably the most important together with my wife Christine have been our four children, Suzanna Diener, Ph.D. (Aerospace Engineering), Group Leader in Remote Sensing at Northrop Grumman, Boulder, CO; Alison Barth, Ph.D. (Molecular Biology), Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University; Rolf N. Barth, M.D., Associate Professor and Head, Liver Transplant Service, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD; and Christofer D. Barth, M.D., Director, Cardiovascular Critical Care, Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center, Milwaukee, WI.

    Email: rolf.barth@osumc.edu

  • Paul A. Beck, Professor Emeritus
    Political Science, Columbus campus
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    Paul A. Beck

    Before retiring in July 2012, Beck was Distinguished Professor of Social and Behavioral Science and Professor of Political Science with courtesy professor appointments in the School of Communication and Department of Sociology at Ohio State; Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Ohio State; and Chair of its Department of Political Science.  His articles on political parties, voting behavior, and public opinion are published in leading disciplinary and interdisciplinary journals.  He was author/co-author of Party Politics in America (1988, 1992, 1997, 2001) and co-editor of Electoral Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies (1984).  His co-edited book Voting in Old and New Democracies, based on Comparative National Election Project (CNEP) surveys of the electorates in 26 elections in 18 countries, was published by Routledge in August 2015.  His current research is focused around themes studied in the CNEP, which now includes over 30 surveys through 2015.  (See the CNEP website at u.osu.edu/cnep) Beck has received the Distinguished Scholar and Distinguished University Service awards from Ohio State University and the American Political Science Association’s Goodnow Award for distinguished service to the profession and its Eldersveld Award for lifetime professional contributions to the field of political organizations and parties. He is a regular commentator on American politics for a variety of international, national, and local media.

    Email: beck.9@osu.edu

  • Mary Jo Fresch, Professor Emeritus
    Teaching and Learning, Marion campus
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    Mary Jo Fresch

    Mary Jo Fresch was a Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning before retiring in July 2015. Fresch began her career as a 3rd grade teacher in Kent, Ohio. She taught adult literacy at the University of Akron and reading methods at the University of Nebraska (Lincoln). Fresch completed her Doctorate in Language, Literature, and Culture at The Ohio State University. She moved to Melbourne, Australia where she taught for three years in teacher education at Deakin University and The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. Fresch returned to Columbus in 1995. She joined the faculty at The Ohio State University at Marion, where she taught in teacher education for 20 years.

    Her research focus is the developmental aspects of becoming a reader, writer, and speller. Her articles have appeared in peer reviewed journals: Journal of Literacy Research; Reading and Writing Quarterly; Reading Psychology; The Reading Teacher; Language Arts; Journal of Just and Caring Education; Journal of Children's Literatureand several International Literacy Association state journals. She author/co-authored 13 books for teachers, including Strategies for Effective Balanced Literacy; Teaching and Assessing Spelling; Learning Through Poetry (a five book phonemic/phonological awareness series); The Power of Picture Books: Using Content Area Literature in Middle School and edited An Essential History of Current Reading Practices.

    Fresch was actively engaged in service to the university. She represented the Marion campus as a University Senator for six years. During that time she served on the Faculty Council Steering and Senate Rules committees. She was appointed to the University Athletic Council, serving as Vice-chair during 2014-2015. Additionally, Fresch served on Department, College, and Marion campus committees. Fresch was Director of the Study Abroad program to an English Immersion school in Concepcion, Chile. Fresch made eleven trips with Ohio State students, providing professional development for the bilingual teachers. Her professional development presentations have taken her across the United States, as well as abroad to New Zealand, Australia, Argentina, Scotland, Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Jamaica, and Canada. 

    Email: fresch.1@osu.edu

  • George Krakowka, Professor Emeritus
    Veterinary Biosciences, Columbus campus
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    George Krakowka

    Summary: The best way to summarize 37 years (1974 to 2013) of active research as a faculty member of The Ohio State University is to identify scholarly contributions by infectious agents. As well, three co-authored books on veterinary immunology and viral infectious diseases were written and the position of North American editor, Veterinary Immunology and Immuno-pathology was held for 13 years (1987-2000).

    1973-1988: A total of 78 peer-reviewed publications on canine distemper virus (CDV) and related viral diseases of dogs were published. The most important contributions were: CDV strains varied in neurovirulence, immunosuppressive effects of CDV upon developing immunity was a critical determinant of neurovirulence and identification of the canine natural killer (NK) cell. As well, work with X-SCIDs germfree dogs demonstrated that the defect per se was not lethal and that X-SCIDs dogs could be reconstituted with either canine or human CD34+ bone marrow stem cells.

    1987-1998: A total of 49 peer-reviewed publications were published on Helicobacter pylori, a human gastric pathogen and other gastric bacterial pathogens. The most important contributions were: Demonstration that this bacterium caused type A gastritis (Koch’s postulates), development of successful anti-microbial therapies for bacterial gastritis in germfree piglets and identification of Helicobacter pylori-like organisms in (HPLO) porcine stomachs.

    1999-present: A total of 60 peer-reviewed publications were devoted to the most important viral infectious disease of modern swine production, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). The most significant contributions to this field were: Proof for the concept that induction of PMWS by PCV2 requires that action(s) of co-factors (usually immune stimulation) for full disease expression, the identification of certain widely-used swine bacterin formulations had an unanticipated potentiating effect on PCV2/PMWS and the identification of a three amino acid segment in within the second immunogenic epitope of the nucleocapsid protein is critical for virulence.

    2008-2011: A total of 6 publications concern the topic of porcine torque teno viruses (TTVs). The most significant contributions to this field were: Established a link between TTV infection and a reproducible spectrum of gross and histologic lesions in young swine, recognition that TTV potentiates mortality rates for both PCV2 and also porcine reproductive and respiratory virus syndrome (PRRSV) viruses and that TTV DNAs (and very likely infectious TTVs) are present in commercial swine bacterins.

    2012-present: The last several years have been devoted to developing a germfree piglet model of human norovirus infection and vaccination/challenge studies with two newly emergent and lethal porcine coronavirus infections, PEDV and PdCV.

    1973-present: Finally, over 100 peer-reviewed publications have addressed general or specific topics in Veterinary immunology and pathology.

    Email: krakowka.1@osu.edu

  • Joan R. Leitzel, Professor Emeritus
    Mathematics, Columbus campus
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    Joan R. Leitzel

    Joan R. Leitzel was a Professor of Mathematics at Ohio State and moved into administration as Associate Provost for Curriculum and Instruction.  In 1990 she went to the National Science Foundation as a division director, and then to the University of Nebraska as Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost.  She then became President of the University of New Hampshire.  She retired in 2002 and returned to Columbus. 

    During her retirement Dr. Leitzel continues to be engaged with her field of mathematics and with higher education issues and institutions.  She has chaired the Mathematical Sciences Education Board at the National Research Council and also the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences.  In 2008-09 she returned to Ohio State full time to lead the restructuring of Arts and Sciences.   In 2013 she chaired the Steering Committee formed by the Ohio Board of Regents to craft goals and a process for updating undergraduate mathematics programs at Ohio’s postsecondary institutions, an initiative now led by the chairpersons of those departments.    In the last two years she has testified twice before Ohio legislative committees against bills to withdraw from the Common Core Standards, and she continues to meet periodically with the Ohio Standards Coalition and the Ohio Mathematics and Science Coalition.  At the national level she has served and continues to serve on several national committees during her retirement, including the NCES Project to Assess Algebraic Reasoning, the MAA Strategic Planning Committee, various NSF proposal review panels and program reviews, and APLU’s Advisory Board for the Mathematics Teacher Education Partnership.  She currently is a member of the national advisory board for the Association for Women in Mathematics and the national advisory board for the Command, Control, and Interoperability Center for Advanced Data Analysis at Rutgers.

    In 2014, Dr. Leitzel received the Gung and Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics from the Mathematical Association of America, and in 2015 she received the Friend of Mathematics Award from the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

    Email: joan.leitzel@unh.edu

  • Lois A. Rosow, Professor Emeritus
    Music, Columbus campus
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    Lois A. Rosow

    Lois Rosow retired as Professor of Music in 2014. She headed the Musicology Area of the School of Music for eighteen years, and currently serves as a part-time administrator for that area. She received her B.A. from Oberlin College and her Ph.D. from Brandeis University. Her research is focused mainly on European music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. She is an authority on French opera of that period, with particular interest in text-music relations, allegorical meaning, music printing and engraving, performance-practice issues, and the administrative history and scribal workshop of the Paris Opera. Her critical edition of Armide by Jean-Baptiste Lully (Olms, 2003), completed with a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, has served for productions released on audio CD (Naxos, 2008) and DVD (FRA musica, 2011). She has published in the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Early Music, the Cambridge Opera Journal, The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Music, and various anthologies, among them Lully Studies (Cambridge, 2000) and New Perspectives on Marc-Antoine Charpentier (Ashgate, 2010).  She served as guest editor of a special issue of the Journal of Seventeenth-Century Music (10:1, 2004), devoted to Lully’s opera Persée, and was recently appointed Editor-in-Chief of JSCM. She has served as president of the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music and on the Board of Directors of the American Musicological Society.

    Email: rosow.1@osu.edu

Emeritus Academy Members

Any member without a biosketch is encouraged to submit one. Submit biosketch here.

  • Laszlo Adler, Professor Emeritus
    Integrated Systems Engineering, Columbus campus
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    Laszlo Adler

    I took early retirement in 1995. At the time I was the Taine McDougal Professor in the Department of Industrial, Welding and Systems Engineering. I was also the Director of the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Program which was established in 1981. After my retirement I continued to teach my classes (which I developed in NDE Program) for several years flying every week from Florida.  In addition to my teaching, I continued and still continuing research in ultrasonics and its application to materials. The research was supported through various government agencies, NAVAIR, NASA Langley Research Center as well as though aerospace companies, Boeing, Martin Mariette, Bell Helicopter. The research was in collaboration with OSU faculty, Postdocs and graduate students. Since my retirement I authored and coauthored 25 publications in national and international journals and proceedings. I also attended several national and international meetings in my field making presentations. I am an active fellow in the Acoustical Society of America. I am also actively involved with NASA to to carry out research as well as to evaluate research proposals from universities. I intend to continue these activities. I am a speaker for 2016 International Conference on Acoustics in Buenos Ayres).

    Email: ladler1@aol.com

  • Karen Ahijevych, Professor Emeritus
    Nursing, Columbus campus
  • James Altschuld, Professor Emeritus
    Educational Policy and Leadership, Columbus campus
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    James Altschuld

    After working as a chemist (bachelor and, master’s degrees) James W. Altschuld reentered graduate school and completed the doctorate in educational research and development.  Over a 45 plus year career he has pursued the following interests: 

    • assessment of educational, social, and agency needs,
    • aspects of the evaluation of programs mainly in education but some in other settings, and
    • professionalizing the field of evaluation and those who practice its arts.

    He taught program evaluation, needs assessment, and basic educational research methods in the College of Education and Human Ecology at The Ohio State University until retirement in 2004 and for another year beyond that.  He has remained active in program evaluation through projects, consulting, presenting at national meetings, and research efforts.   He has received local, state, and national awards for his contributions to the field.

    As part of the above activities he authored or co-authored 4 books as well edited a fifth one on how to do needs assessments from conceptualization, implementation, and utilizing results for the improving of organizations.  He wrote another book (2014) about the relationship of needs to assets and capacity building again aimed at the improvement of organizations and society.. 

    Coupled with this writing he has continually been involved in studies about how we assess needs including the design of surveys and other instruments, better ways to scale measurements, and issues related to procedures for assessment.  One other prominent theme has been in regard to how evaluators should be trained and considerations for credentialing or certifying them.

    In addition to his writings on needs assessments he has many publications and papers especially over the last 2 decades.  Opportunities to do research into the described topics have been continuous and appear to be on the increase and Altschuld would be most willing to work with others as well as mentor colleagues and associates in this regard.

    Email: altschuld.1@osu.edu

  • Hal R. Arkes, Professor Emeritus
    Psychology, Columbus campus
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    Hal R. Arkes

    Hal R. Arkes is an Emeritus Professor of Psychology at Ohio State University.  He received his B.A. from Carleton College in 1967 and his Ph.D. in Psychology in 1971 from the University of Michigan.  He served as a program director at the National Science Foundation in Washington during 1993-1995 and again in 1998-2000.  In 1996-1997 he served as the President of the Society for Judgment and Decision Making. His research interests are in judgment and decision making, principally medical and economic decision making.  He has over 100 publications in these areas.

    Dr. Arkes has won several teaching awards, and a few of his research papers have also won awards. He has served on the editorial board of every major journal in his field. He has team-taught in the Department of Economics and at the Moritz School of Law at OSU.  His most prolific contribution is serving tens of thousands of meals as a cook in the US Army.

    Email: arkes.1@osu.edu

  • William Ausich, Professor Emeritus
    Earth Sciences, Columbus campus
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    William Ausich

    Bill Ausich received his undergraduate degree in geology from the University of Illinois and an A.M and Ph.D. in geology from Indiana University. His first position was at Wright State University, and he moved to The Ohio State University in 1984. He held a Research Fellow appointment at Trinity College, Dublin, which was made possible by a Fulbright Fellowship. Dr. Ausich's research focus is in three areas: 1, evolutionary dynamics of Paleozoic crinoid faunas through major episodes of climate and biosphere change; 2, phylogeny and classification of Paleozoic crinoids; and 3, paleocommunity dynamics through the Phanerozoic. Present research includes phylogenetic reconstruction of crinoids; origination and extinction; description of new faunas from Canada, China, Estonia, and Spain; systematics of Mississippian crinoids from south-central Kentucky; and completing the Revised Crinoid Treatise on Invertebrate Paleontology. He is author of more than 225 scientific publications and author or editor of 6 books and monographs. His research has been recognized with the Schuchert Award of the Paleontological Society; the Richard Owen Outstanding Alumnus Award, Indiana University; and the Gilbert Harris Award, Paleontological Research Institution. He is a fellow of the Geological Society of America, Paleontological Society, and American Association for the Advancement of Sciences. He served as Chair of the Ohio State Department of Geological Sciences and as President of the Paleontological Society. At Ohio State, Dr. Ausich has received the Harlan Hatcher Arts and Sciences Distinguished Faculty Award, The Distinguished Scholar Award, and several teaching awards from the School of Earth Sciences.

    Email: ausich.1@osu.edu

  • Leona Ayers, Professor Emeritus
    Pathology, Columbus campus
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    Leona Ayers

    I retired in 2013 as Professor, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, but continued working in faculty and hospital pathology Attending Staff positions. My pathology practice (Transfusion Medicine) continued until June 2015 when my Attending Staff status changed to Physician Scholar. Currently I serve as Principle Investigator (PI) for the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Collaborative Human Tissue Network (CHTN/NCI), 2010-2019. Research focus on infection and cancer in human tissues developed during my years (1971-1997) as Medical Director, Clinical Microbiology Laboratories where I managed infection diagnoses complicated by the emerging AIDS epidemic in the early 1980s. During the 1980s I contributed nationally as Fellow of American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP) and served as Chair 1981-85 of the ASCP Council on Microbiology to bring recognition to HIV/AIDS related infections and cancer. I also served as Fellow member of the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Microbiology Resource Committee, 1983-88. In 2014, I completed 19 years as PI of the Mid-Region AIDS and Cancer Specimen Resource (MR ACSR/NCI) deployed in 1995 in consortium with University of Texas, Southwestern (Dallas, Texas), Emory University (Atlanta, Ga) and Rush University (Chicago, IL). The MR ACSR/NCI provided resources for me to extend clinical and academic AIDS related activities to sub-Saharan Africa. NCI supplements to my MR ACSR/NCI grant for capacity building in diagnosis and study of AIDS related malignancies facilitated establishment of the Sub-Saharan African Lymphoma Consortium (SSALC/NCI) with pathology colleagues at the University of Nairobi (Nairobi, Kenya), Makerere University (Kampala, Uganda), Stellenbosch University (Cape Town, South Africa), Witwatersrand University (Johannesburg, South Africa), Lymphoma Study Group, Institute Human Virology Nigeria (IHVN, Abuja, Nigeria), Ahmadu Bello University (Zaria, Nigeria) and Imperial College (London, England). Collaborations in the subgrouping and immunophenotyping of HIV/AIDS associated malignant lymphoma followed as did other NCI grants with complimentary focus. MR ACSR supplements supported study of Burkitt lymphoma (BL) in the Epidemiology of Burkitt Lymphoma in East-African Children and Minors (EMBLEM) NCI program. I served as the 2015 Chair of the International Interlymph Committee that facilitates research into Burkitt lymphoma lymphomagenesis and treatment worldwide and continue as EMBLEM program pathologist. Over my career I have delivered 260 invited presentations at professional and scientific programs, conferences and workshops in the USA, Canada, Israel, Turkey, Serbia, Italy, France and Morocco as well as in Uganda, Kenya, Tanzania, South Africa, Nigeria and at Tata Memorial Hospital in Mumbai, India. I have had the pleasure of participating as a lecturer in the education of thousands of OSU dental students, medical students, residents, graduate students and allied health students and as an advisor to 35 graduate, graduate professional, fellowship and special students. What has been learned is shared in 344 published abstracts, journal articles, reviews, book chapters, journal letters and technical newsletters. I started my career as a Zoology major with a BS degree awarded by Duke University in 1962.  A master’s of Human Anatomy degree program that same year at Duke University School of Medicine followed but in a remarkable turn of events in 1964, I joined the second year of Duke Medical Class ’67 and graduated with honors in 1967.  I found an intellectual home in pathology and completed my residency in anatomical pathology at Duke Medical Center and in Clinical Pathology at University Hospitals, The Ohio State University (OSU), followed by Certification by the American Board of Pathology in Anatomical and Clinical Pathology. OSU has been my medical practice and academic venue for over 45 years providing rewarding patient disease diagnosis opportunities, challenging patient care, enriching student, faculty and staff interactions and worldwide enlightening and inspiring experiences unimaginable at the beginning of my journey.

    Email: ayers.1@osu.edu

  • Gregory Baker, Ohio Eminent Scholar Professor Emeritus
    Mathematics, Columbus campus
  • Rolf F. Barth, Professor Emeritus
    Pathology, Columbus campus
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    Rolf F. Barth

    I obtained my undergraduate degree from Cornell University and my medical degree from the College of Physicians & Surgeons of Columbia University. Following this I did an internship in Surgery at Columbia University Medical Center, followed by a Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. This was followed by additional training in Immunology and Pathology at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. From there I joined the Department of Pathology and Oncology at the University of Kansas Medical, progressing from an Assistant to full Professor in six years. I joined the OSU Department of Pathology in 1979 as Professor and transitioned to Emeritus status in 2013.

    I have been involved in cancer research for the past 35 years. The pri­mary focus of my research has been in the field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for the treatment of malignant gliomas, one of the most malignant of human cancers. BNCT is a noninvasive therapeutic modality for treating locally invasive malignant tumors such as primary brain tumors and recurrent head and neck cancer. It is a two-step procedure: first, the patient is injected with a non-radioactive tumor localizing boron-10–containing drug that has a high propensity to capture slow neutrons. The cross section of the boron-10 is one to two thousand times greater than that of the other elements normally present in tissues. In the second step, the patient is radiated with epithermal neutrons, which after losing energy as they penetrate tissue, are absorbed by the boron-10, which subsequently emits high-energy radiation, resulting in a biologically destructive nuclear reaction. I have utilized my training in tumor immu­nol­ogy to focus on the use of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), directed against specific molecular targets such as the epi­dermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), as boron delivery agents for BNCT to treat malignant brain tumors using a rat brain tumor model. Another component of my BNCT research has focused on the evaluation of low molecular weight boron compounds and opti­mization of their delivery for the treatment of brain tumors. A new area of research over the past 8 years has focused on another chemoradiothera­peutic approach for the treatment of brain tumors that combines administration of the anti-cancer drugs carboplatin or cisplatin directly to the site of the brain tumor com­bined with radiotherapy. This research has been funded by a variety of sources, including the National Institutes of Health, the American Cancer Society, the Department of Energy, and numerous private foundations. In addition to the research described above, I have had clinical responsibilities as a Pathologist on the Autopsy Service.

    Over the course of my academic career I have mentored numerous Graduate Students and Postdoctoral Fellows, but unquestionably the most important together with my wife Christine have been our four children, Suzanna Diener, Ph.D. (Aerospace Engineering), Group Leader in Remote Sensing at Northrop Grumman, Boulder, CO; Alison Barth, Ph.D. (Molecular Biology), Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University; Rolf N. Barth, M.D., Associate Professor and Head, Liver Transplant Service, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD; and Christofer D. Barth, M.D., Director, Cardiovascular Critical Care, Aurora St. Luke’s Medical Center, Milwaukee, WI.

    Email: rolf.barth@osumc.edu

  • Lawrence Baum, Professor Emeritus
    Political Science, Columbus campus
  • Paul A. Beck, Professor Emeritus
    Political Science, Columbus campus
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    Paul A. Beck

    Before retiring in July 2012, Beck was Distinguished Professor of Social and Behavioral Science and Professor of Political Science with courtesy professor appointments in the School of Communication and Department of Sociology at Ohio State; Dean of the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Ohio State; and Chair of its Department of Political Science.  His articles on political parties, voting behavior, and public opinion are published in leading disciplinary and interdisciplinary journals.  He was author/co-author of Party Politics in America (1988, 1992, 1997, 2001) and co-editor of Electoral Change in Advanced Industrial Democracies (1984).  His co-edited book Voting in Old and New Democracies, based on Comparative National Election Project (CNEP) surveys of the electorates in 26 elections in 18 countries, was published by Routledge in August 2015.  His current research is focused around themes studied in the CNEP, which now includes over 30 surveys through 2015.  (See the CNEP website at u.osu.edu/cnep) Beck has received the Distinguished Scholar and Distinguished University Service awards from Ohio State University and the American Political Science Association’s Goodnow Award for distinguished service to the profession and its Eldersveld Award for lifetime professional contributions to the field of political organizations and parties. He is a regular commentator on American politics for a variety of international, national, and local media.

    Email: beck.9@osu.edu

  • Edward Behrman, Professor Emeritus
    Biochemistry, Columbus campus
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    Edward Behrman

    Edward J. Behrman received a B. S. from Yale in 1952 and a Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1957 working with R. Y. Stanier. After post-doctoral research with W. E. Knox (Harvard) and J. O. Edwards (Brown), he was appointed Assistant Professor at the Ohio State University in 1965. He retired in 2005 but still carries out research and teaches.

    Email: behrman.1@osu.edu

  • Morris Beja, Professor Emeritus
    English, Columbus campus
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    Morris Beja

    Morris Beja is Professor Emeritus at the Ohio State University, where he is the recipient of the University’s Alumni Distinguished Teaching Award; he chaired the Department of English for eleven years. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Thessaloniki, Greece; University College Dublin, Ireland; Northwestern University, U.S.A.; and Beijing Foreign Studies University, China. Among the honors he has received are a Guggenheim Fellowship and two Fulbright Lectureships. His books include Epiphany in the Modern Novel; Film and Literature; James Joyce: A Literary Life; and Tell Us About . . . A Memoir. He has edited a scholarly edition of Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway as well as volumes of essays on James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Samuel Beckett, and Orson Welles, and is the author of numerous essays on film and on Irish, British, and American fiction. He has edited the James Joyce Newestlatter since 1977. He founded the International Virginia Woolf Society and is Executive Secretary, past President, and Honorary Trustee for Life of the International James Joyce Founda¬tion, which presented him a Lifetime Achievement Award on Bloomsday, 2010. He has directed or co-directed numerous international conferences, one on Beckett and seven on Joyce, including Bloomsday 100, the International James Joyce Symposium in Dublin, June 2004.

    Email: beja.1@osu.edu

  • Michael Benedict, Professor Emeritus
    History, Columbus campus
  • Stig M. Bergström, Professor Emeritus
    Earth Sciences, Columbus campus
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    Stig M. Bergström

    Received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from Lund University, Sweden. Lecturer at Lund University 1962-67. Assistant Professor and Orton Museum Curator at the Ohio State University 1968, promoted to Associate Professor 1970, and to Professor and Museum Director in 1972. Retired in 2002. Dr. Bergström’s research has focused on global Lower Paleozoic biostratigraphy, paleontology (especially conodonts, chitinozoans, and graptolites), chemostratigraphy, volcanic ashes (K-bentonites), paleobiogeography, paleogeography, and Ordovician meteorites. Author of more than 575 science articles, abstracts, and books, more than 125 of these published after his retirement. Fellow of several leading geology societies. Recipient of  a variety of national and international awards and honors, the most important being elected to Member of the Royal Physiographic Society (1980; after the Royal Swedish Academy of Science, the most prestigious Natural Science Academy in Sweden); Honorary Doctorate, Lund University, Sweden (1987); received the Hadding Prize (1985; the most prestigious geology award in Sweden); awarded the Raymond C. Moore Medal from the Society of Sedimentary Geology for “Excellence in Paleontology and Stratigraphy” (1999; one of the two most prestigious awards in this field in North America); received The Golden Medal from Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic (1989; for “Outstanding Contributions to Ordovician Stratigraphy”); awarded The Pander Gold Medal (2001; the highest international award in conodont research); received The Paleontological Society Medal (2011; the most prestigious award in Paleontology in North America); received the Digby McLaren Medal (2012; the highest international career award in stratigraphy, awarded only once every fourth year); and the Science Excellence Award of the International Commission on Stratigraphy (2012; along with the Digby McLaren Medal , the international top prize in stratigraphy). Paleontologists have named two genera and 8 species of four groups of fossil organisms for Stig M. Bergström.

    Email: bergstrom.1@osu.edu

  • Mark L. Berliner, Professor Emeritus
    Statistics, Columbus campus
  • Gary Berntson, Professor Emeritus
    Psychology, Columbus campus
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    Gary Berntson

    Gary Berntson was a Professor of Psychology at the Ohio State University and on the faculty of the Neurosciences Graduate Program. He has also held joint appointments in the Departments of Psychiatry and Pediatrics. During his tenure at Ohio State, Berntson also held an appointment as an Affiliate Scientist at the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center (Emory University), and was a Visiting Professor at the University of Chicago. His research has been in the area of behavioral neuroscience, psychophysiology and psychosomatic medicine. He has published over 200 peer-reviewed articles and has edited numerous books, including the Handbook of Psychophysiology and the Handbook of Neuroscience for the Behavioral Sciences. He held several offices in the Society for Psychophysiological Research (SPR), including a member of the board of directors (2006-2012), secretary (2006-2009) and President (2011-2012). He also chaired the SPR committee on standards and guidelines for Heart Rate Variability studies. He has served on numerous federal advisory committees (NIH, NSF, Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Defense, Defense Science Board), as well as international agencies (Austrian Science Fund and the Portuguese Science Foundation). Berntson is a Fellow in several professional associations and has served on the editorial boards of numerous journals, including Psychophysiology, the International Journal of Psychophysiology and Emotion Review, among others. He was the recipient of a Distinguished Scholar awards from the Ohio State University, a Distinguished Teaching award from the Department of Psychology, and an Ohio House of Representatives special recognition for scholarship. He also received the Paul D MacLean Award for Outstanding Neuroscience Research from American Psychosomatic Society (2013).

    Email: berntson.2@osu.edu

  • Tim Berra, Professor Emeritus
    Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Mansfield campus
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    Tim Berra

    Berra earned a BS in Biology (St. Louis University) and an M.S. and Ph.D in Biology (Tulane University). This was followed in 1969 by a Fulbright Post-Doctoral Fellowship (Australian National University) where the taxonomy of Murray cod and Trout cod was clarified. From there Berra accepted a position at the newly opened University of Papua New Guinea where he studied the fishes of a jungle river system and taught genetics and evolution. These experiences resulted in a life-long career studying weird Australian fishes. He joined OSU in 1972.

    In 1979 Berra was a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar at Monash University (Melbourne) where he elaborated the life cycle of the Australian Grayling. This was followed by studies of the natural history of the Salamanderfish and Megamouth Shark in Western Australia in 1986 and 1988-9 as a Research Associate of the Western Australian Museum.

    Berra was visiting professor at the University of Concepcion (Chile 1992) and the University of Otago (Dunedin, New Zealand 1996) where he studied the ecology and taxonomy of southern hemisphere galaxiid fishes.

    He was editor-in-chief of the Ohio Journal of Science, served on the Board of Trustees of the Columbus Zoo & Aquarium, and the Board of Governors of the American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists. He took early retirement from teaching in 1995 in order to have more time to devote to Australian field research and writing.

    In 2001 he began a long term field project on the life history of Nurseryfish in Australia’s Northern Territory. The males of this bizarre species carry the egg mass on a hook on their head like a bunch of grapes. This study is ongoing.

    In 2009 Berra was a Fulbright Senior Specialist and keynoted the Charles Darwin Bicentennial celebrations at Charles Darwin University where he is University Professorial Fellow.

    He is the author of over 80 scientific publications and 8 books including Evolution and the Myth of Creationism (1990), A Natural History of Australia (1998), Freshwater Fish Distribution (2007), Charles Darwin: The Concise Story of an Extraordinary Man (2009), and Darwin & His Children: His Other Legacy (2013). http://u.osu.edu/berra.1/

    Email: berra.1@osu.edu

  • Robert Brodkey, Professor Emeritus
    Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Columbus campus
  • Lucy Caswell, Professor Emeritus
    University Libraries, Columbus campus
  • Kenneth Chan, Professor Emeritus
    Pharmacy, Columbus campus
  • Daniel Christie, Professor Emeritus
    Psychology, Marion campus
  • Malcom Cochran, Professor Emeritus
    Art, Columbus campus
  • Terry Conlisk, Professor Emeritus
    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Columbus campus
  • Martha C. Cooper, Professor Emeritus
    Marketing and Logistics, Columbus campus
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    Martha C. Cooper

    Martha C. Cooper is Professor Emeritus of Marketing and Logistics at the Ohio State University. She received a B.S. in Math/Computer Science and a Masters in Industrial Administration from Purdue University. Her doctorate is from Ohio State. She has been on the OSU faculty since 1982.

    Professor Cooper's research interests include supply chain management, partnership and other inter-firm relationships, corporate strategy, international logistics, and women in logistics/SCM. She has co authored three books, Customer Service: A Management Perspective, Partnerships in Providing Customer Service: A Third Party Perspective, and Strategic Planning for Logistics. Since 1997, she has conducted an annual survey of women in logistics for the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP). The most recent results are posted on their web site (cscmp.org). Professor Cooper has over one hundred publications.

    Professor Cooper Has taught undergraduate, masters, and doctoral level logistics courses, and has received outstanding teaching awards. Prior to obtaining her doctorate at The Ohio State University, she was on the marketing faculties of Western Carolina University and Austin Peay State University. Other marketing experiences include work in brand management and in sales.

    Professor Cooper has presented at the meetings of professional organizations and continuing education programs in the U.S., Canada, Eastern and Western Europe, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. She has served several professional organizations in various national and local capacities, including the American Marketing Association, The Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (formerly NCPDM and CLM), INFORMS, SOLE - The International Society of Logistics, and the Warehouse Education and Research Council (WERC).

    Email: cooper.7@osu.edu

  • Leandro Cordero, Professor Emeritus
    Pediatrics, Columbus campus
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    Leandro Cordero

    I received my bachelor and Reserve Army Officer degrees at Liceo Militar General San Martin (1954) and my medical doctor at the Buenos Aires School of Medicine (1959) in Argentina.  Following my post graduate training at the Dr Pedro De Elizalde Children’s Hospital, I practiced Pediatrics for 4 years in a small rural town south of Buenos Aires.  In search of further specialization, I came to the United States where I completed a residency in Pediatrics at The Yale New Haven Medical Center followed by a fellowship in Epidemiology and Public Health and another in Neonatology at The Yale University School of Medicine.  For 2 years I held a faculty appointment there before becoming a visiting professor for the Organization of American States at the Latin American Center of Perinatology in Montevideo, Uruguay.  Later, I became a consultant in Neonatology for the World Health Organization.

    In 1971 I joined the faculty at The Ohio State University as Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the Division of Neonatal Perinatal Medicine where I served in this capacity through June 2011.  In its beginning, the Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) had 8 bassinets and the Well Baby Nursery (WBN) had 20.  The yearly census was 700 infants at the NICU and about 2,100 infants at the WBN.  During the next 40 years, both units expanded and served 1,100 infants in NICU and close to 3,000 in the WBN.  During my tenure, I was responsible for supervising and providing care to approximately 40,000 premature and sick infants at the NICU and over 120,000 healthy infants at the WBN.  In 1971, I was the only trained Neonatologist in Columbus.  Today, more than 40 Neonatologists share the responsibilities for the care of a very needy population.  I was promoted to Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics in 1976 and upon my retirement (2011) to Professor Emeritus.  As a physician, I will always treasure the opportunity to have served my patients and their families with absolute dedication and compassion.  The recognition of the Ohio Senate Resolution No. 4656 (1996) and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the March of Dimes (2003) for my contributions to Neonatology are some of my more treasured awards.  Throughout the years I was privileged to be associated with many faculty from the College of Medicine as well as from other colleges and I am grateful and proud that many of them became partners in research and are memorialized in many of my publications.  I was also fortunate that at the time of my retirement, the department of Pediatrics offered me a part-time position to continue my clinical teaching and research activities, albeit at a slower pace.

    Email: leondro.cordero@osumc.edu

  • David Cressy, Professor Emeritus
    History, Columbus campus
  • Alan Crockett, Associate Professor Emeritus
    Art, Columbus campus
  • David Culver, Professor Emeritus
    Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Columbus campus
  • Angela Dean, Professor Emeritus
    Statistics, Columbus campus
  • David L. Denlinger, Professor Emeritus
    Entomology, Columbus campus
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    David L. Denlinger

    David Denlinger received his undergraduate degree in zoology from the Pennsylvania State University and his Ph.D. in entomology from the University of Illinois.  He received a postdoctoral fellowship from the Agricultural University, Wageningen, the Netherlands, an NIH postdoctoral fellowship for work at the International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology in Nairobi, Kenya, and then returned to the US as a Research Scientist at Harvard before joining the faculty of Ohio State University, where he advanced from the rank of Assistant Professor to Distinguished University Professor and served as Chair of the Department of Entomology for 11 years.   Dr. Denlinger’s research focuses on the molecular physiology of insect development, especially the mechanisms used by insects to enter dormancy (diapause) to survive adverse seasons such as winter or tropical dry seasons.   His interests range from an ecological understanding of seasonal development, to mechanisms of photoperiodism, to the downstream gene pathways that result in the manifestation of dormancy.  His interests in overwintering include probing cold hardiness physiology, experiments that examine the molecules that enable low temperature survival in temperate latitude winters as well as in Antarctica. He has also maintained an active interest in the reproductive physiology of the tsetse fly, vector of African sleeping sickness.  He has authored over 300 scientific publications, several books, and has been supported by grants from NIH, NSF and USDA.  He is the recipient of numerous awards including election to the National Academy of Sciences, recipient of the Gregor Mendel Medal from the Czech Academy of Sciences;  Outstanding Alumnus Award from Penn State; Honorary Fellow of the Royal Entomological Society; Recognition Award in Insect Physiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Founders Memorial Award, C.V. Riley Achievement Award, and Fellow of the Entomological Society of America;  Antarctic Service Medal; Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; Honorary Professor of Chinese Academy of Sciences.  He served as editor of the Journal of Insect Physiology for 20 years, currently edits Current Opinion in Insect Science, and serves on the editorial boards of seven additional journals.

  • John Dimmick, Associate Professor Emeritus
    Communications, Columbus campus
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    John Dimmick

    John Dimmick (PhD, University of Michigan) was on the regular faculty of the School of Communication for 35 years as Assistant and Associate Professor. His work is concentrated in the area of media economics and management.  Publications include some  40 refereed articles, 13 book chapters, numerous convention papers, for which was awarded 4 top paper awards, and a book entitled  Media Competition and Coexistence: The Theory of the Niche.  He received the Robert Picard Award for this work from the media management and economics division of AEJMC. This book has been translated into Korean and Chinese. For further biographical information see his  listings in Who’s Who in America and Who’s Who in the World.

    Email: dimmick.1@osu.edu

  • Joseph F. Donnermeyer, Professor Emeritus
    School of Environment and Natural Resources, Columbus campus
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    Joseph F. Donnermeyer

    Dr. Joseph F. Donnermeyer is a professor emeritus in the School of Environment and Natural Resources at The Ohio State University. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology from the University of Kentucky, and his B.A. degree in Sociology from Thomas More College in Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky. He currently holds appointments as an adjunct professor with the School of Justice (Faculty of Law) at the Queensland University of Technology (Brisbane, AU) and is a Research Associate at the Center on Research on Violence at West Virginia University (Morgantown, USA).

    Dr. Donnermeyer’s specialization is rural criminology. He has conducted research on numerous rural crime topics, including levels of victimization and attitudes toward crime among rural people, the extent and pattern of offending by rural populations, especially the etiology of substance use by rural youth, and the criminology of food and agriculture. He is the founding editor of the on-line journal titled The International Journal of Rural Criminology (OSU Libraries, Knowledge Bank).

    Dr. Donnermeyer is the author (co-author) of over 100 peer reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and books on issues related to rural crime and rural societies. He is a trainer in various executive development and leadership programs through the Ohio Association of Chiefs of Police (the Police Executive Leadership Program and the Certified Law Enforcement Executive Program), the Ohio Fire Chiefs Association program on leadership, and other organizations on topics related to community and social change.

    With Walter DeKeseredy at West Virginia University, Dr. Donnermeyer is the co-author of Rural Criminology (2014), a monograph in the Critical Criminology Series sponsored by Routledge. He is the editor of Routledge International Handbook of Rural Criminology (2016), and is currently preparing the Criminology of Food and Agriculture (Routledge). He was recently selected as editor of the Routledge Monograph Series in Rural Criminology.

    Dr. Donnermeyer has been the recipient of numerous awards for teaching and advising, including the Excellence in Instruction award of the Rural Sociological Society, the Teaching Award of Merit from Gamma Sigma Delta (an agricultural honorary society), The Ohio State University Alumni Association Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2004, and the North Central Regional winner of the Teaching Award from The Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities in 2011. From 2005-2010, he served as Chair of the Executive Council for the OSU Academy of Teaching. The Academy itself is includes all winners of the university-wide OSU Alumni Association Award.

    Dr. Donnermeyer continues to teach RS 1500 (Introduction to Rural Sociology), a GE course, and RS 5580 (Assessing the Human and Social Impacts of Change). Recently, he developed the e-version of RS 1500.

    Although a criminologist for all of his academic career, he has a deep interest in the social, cultural and economic changes affecting the Amish. Specifically, his Amish research concerns examination of the demographic dimensions of the Amish, including population growth, settlement expansion and occupational change. Through much of his career, he annually taught a rural sociology course – Amish Society – at OSU. For the Religious Congregational and Membership Survey in 2012, Dr. Donnermeyer developed county-based estimates of the Amish population. He is the co-founder of The Journal of Amish and Plain Anabaptist Studies and currently serves as the associate editor (OSU Libraries, Knowledge Bank). In March, 2016, Dr. Donnermeyer presented “Understanding the Amish” for the OSU TedX.

    Email: donnermeyer.1@osu.edu

     

  • David Elliot, Professor Emeritus
    Earth Sciences, Columbus campus
  • Helen Fehervary, Professor Emeritus
    Germanic Languages & Literatures, Columbus campus
  • Carter V. Findley, Professor Emeritus
    History, Columbus campus
  • Carole Fink, Professor Emeritus
    History, Columbus campus
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    Carole Fink

    Carole Fink, Humanities Distinguished Professor of History Emerita at The Ohio State University and Professor of History Emerita at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, has recently published Cold War: An International History. She is the author of two prize-winning books, Defending the Rights of Others: The Great Powers, the Jews, and International Minority Protection, 1878-1938, and The Genoa Conference: European Diplomacy, 1921-1922 as well as Marc Bloch: A Life in History, which has been translated into six languages. She has also edited seven books and published some sixty articles and chapters in European International History and is currently writing a book on West German-Israeli relations between 1965 and 1974, which is under contract with Cambridge University Press.

    Prof. Fink has received numerous research awards, among them from the German Marshall Fund of the United States, the Fulbright Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the American Council of Learned Societies, and has been awarded residential fellowships at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton; the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum; the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, DC; and the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis.

    Email: fink.24@osu.edu

  • Belton M. Fleisher, Professor Emeritus
    Economics, Columbus campus
  • Yuval Z. Flicker, Professor Emeritus
    Mathematics, Columbus campus
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    Yuval Z. Flicker

    Yuval Zvi Flicker (Hebrew: יוּבַל צְבִי פְלִיקֶר‎‎; born 1955 in Israel) is an American mathematician. His primary research interests include automorphic representations.

    He received his PhD degree from the University of Cambridge in 1978. His thesis advisor was Alan Baker, in the area of transcendental number theory. 

    He taught at Princeton University, Columbia University, Harvard University and Ohio State University, where he is now a Professor. He also worked with David Kazhdan and Pierre Deligne. 

    Education
    Born 1955 in Kfar-Saba, raised in Ramat-Gan, Flicker studied Mathematics and Philosophy at Tel-Aviv University gaining a BA in 1973, then he studied Mathematics at the Hebrew University gaining an MA in 1974. After that he studied Part III of the Mathematical Tripos at DPMMS, Cambridge University in 1974-75, where he was awarded his PhD under the supervision of Fields Medalist Alan Baker in 1978. His dissertation was "Linear forms on Abelian Varieties over Local Fields". He was a Post Doctoral scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study Princeton 1978-79, taught at Columbia University 1979-81, at Princeton University 1981-85, and at Harvard University 1985-87. He worked as a Professor of Mathematics at the Ohio State University from 1987 to 2015.

    Research
    Flicker's research interests include Automorphic and Admissible Representations, Automorphic forms over function fields, Arithmetic Geometry, Lifting of Representations, Hecke-Iwahori algebras, p-adic automorphic forms, Galois Cohomology, Local-Global Principles, Motives, Algebraic Groups, Covering Groups, Shimura Varieties. He coauthored works with David Kazhdan, Pierre Deligne, his students and other scholars. He acknowledges influence of Joseph Bernstein and of Vladimir Drinfeld. He is the author of several books.

    Dissemination
    Flicker visited and lectured at the Universities of Mannheim, Bielefeld, Münster, Essen, Köln, HU Berlin supported by a Humboldt Stiftung, DAAD and SFB; at MPIM in Bonn; at University of Tokyo; at TIFR Bombay (and later TIFR Mumbai); at University of Santiago, Chile; at University of Buenos Aires supported by a Fulbright award; at the Chinese Academy of Sciences; at National University of Singapore supported by an NUS Senior Fellowship; at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem supported by a Lady Davis Fellowship and Schonbrunn Professorship, and Simons Fellowship; at IMPA Rio de Janeiro; at Erzincan University supported by TÜBİTAK.

    Flicker endorsed An Open Letter to United States Secretary of Education, Richard Riley. 

    Books
    Yuval Flicker is the author of a number of books including:

    • Arthur's Invariant Trace Formula and Comparison of Inner Forms (2016)
    • Drinfeld Moduli Schemes and Automorphic Forms (2013)
    • Automorphic Representations of Low Rank Groups (2006)
    • Automorphic Forms and Shimura Varieties of PGSp(2) (2005)
    • Matching of Orbital Integrals on GL(4) and GSp(2) (1999)

    Email: yzflicker@gmail.com

  • Gideon Fraenkel, Professor Emeritus
    Chemistry, Columbus campus
  • Mary Jo Fresch, Professor Emeritus
    Teaching and Learning, Marion campus
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    Mary Jo Fresch

    Mary Jo Fresch was a Professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning before retiring in July 2015. Fresch began her career as a 3rd grade teacher in Kent, Ohio. She taught adult literacy at the University of Akron and reading methods at the University of Nebraska (Lincoln). Fresch completed her Doctorate in Language, Literature, and Culture at The Ohio State University. She moved to Melbourne, Australia where she taught for three years in teacher education at Deakin University and The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology. Fresch returned to Columbus in 1995. She joined the faculty at The Ohio State University at Marion, where she taught in teacher education for 20 years.

    Her research focus is the developmental aspects of becoming a reader, writer, and speller. Her articles have appeared in peer reviewed journals: Journal of Literacy Research; Reading and Writing Quarterly; Reading Psychology; The Reading Teacher; Language Arts; Journal of Just and Caring Education; Journal of Children's Literatureand several International Literacy Association state journals. She author/co-authored 13 books for teachers, including Strategies for Effective Balanced Literacy; Teaching and Assessing Spelling; Learning Through Poetry (a five book phonemic/phonological awareness series); The Power of Picture Books: Using Content Area Literature in Middle School and edited An Essential History of Current Reading Practices.

    Fresch was actively engaged in service to the university. She represented the Marion campus as a University Senator for six years. During that time she served on the Faculty Council Steering and Senate Rules committees. She was appointed to the University Athletic Council, serving as Vice-chair during 2014-2015. Additionally, Fresch served on Department, College, and Marion campus committees. Fresch was Director of the Study Abroad program to an English Immersion school in Concepcion, Chile. Fresch made eleven trips with Ohio State students, providing professional development for the bilingual teachers. Her professional development presentations have taken her across the United States, as well as abroad to New Zealand, Australia, Argentina, Scotland, Netherlands, Germany, Denmark, Jamaica, and Canada. 

    Email: fresch.1@osu.edu

  • Paul A. Fuerst, Professor Emeritus
    Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Columbus campus
  • Salvador Garcia Castaneda, Professor Emeritus
    Spanish and Portuguese, Columbus campus
  • Richard F. Green, Professor Emeritus
    English, Columbus campus
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    Richard F. Green

    Richard Firth Green was born in England and educated at Jesus College, Oxford (BA and MA), and the University of Toronto (PhD). He moved to Canada in 1965, and has been a Canadian citizen for over forty years. He has taught at a number of Canadian Universities (including Mount Allison University, Bishops University , and the University of British Columbia), but his longest appointment (twenty years) was at Western University in Ontario. In 2002 he moved to the Ohio State University, attracted by its strengths in both medieval studies and folklore, and from 2006 to 2013 he served as Director of the Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. Although his home unit at OSU was the English Department, he regards himself as much a cultural historian as a literary critic; along with standard medieval English literature courses, he regularly taught a course on Witchcraft for CMRS and one on the Traditional Ballad for Folklore; he has also taught non-medieval courses on Literature and Law. His earlier work was generally in the area of late medieval literary patronage, and later he worked on the relationship between literature and law (again, primarily in the late middle ages). His most recent interest in medieval popular culture has borne fruit in the form of a book on medieval fairy beliefs (published by the University of Pennsylvania Press). He has been a Guggenheim Fellow, President of the New Chaucer Society, and a Councilor of the Medieval Academy of America. Richard Firth Green retired at the end of 2015 and now lives in Stratford, Ontario.

    Email: green.693@osu.edu

  • Jean-Michel Guldmann, Professor Emeritus
    Architecture, Columbus campus
  • Richard Gunther, Professor Emeritus
    Political Science, Columbus campus
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    Richard Gunther

    Richard Gunther (PhD, University of California at Berkeley), professor emeritus of political science, is the international co-coordinator of the Comparative National Elections Project and co–principal investigator of national election surveys conducted in Spain (1979, 1982, 1988, 1993 and 2004), the US (2004 and 2012), Uruguay (1994) and Bulgaria (1996). From 1989 through 2000 he served as co-chair of the Subcommittee on Southern Europe of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council. In addition to many scholarly articles and book chapters, Gunther is author or editor of 15 books, most of them dealing with political parties, electoral behavior, the impact of the media on politics and transitions to democratic rule. He is recipient of Ohio State University’s awards for Distinguished University Service and a Distinguished Scholar.  Gunther remains very active in the Comparative National Elections Project which, to date, has undertaken 44 national election surveys in 25 countries.  He is the CNEP's representative on the International Political Science Association's Research Committee on Public Opinion research.

    Email: gunther.1@osu.edu

  • Donna Guy, Distinguished Professor Emeritus
    History, Columbus campus
  • Sheldon Halpern, Professor Emeritus
    Law, Columbus campus
  • Robert Hamlin, Professor Emeritus
    Veterinary Biosciences, Columbus campus
  • Donald Haurin, Professor Emeritus
    Economics, Columbus campus
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    Donald Haurin

    Donald Haurin is a Professor Emeritus of Economics at the Ohio State University. His undergraduate degree is from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and his Ph.D. is from the University of Chicago. He served as Chair of the Department of Economics from 2008 to 2012 and was an Associate Dean of Social and Behavioral Sciences from 1989 to 2004. He served as President of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association in 2009. In 2012 the American Real Estate Society awarded him the David Ricardo Medal, their highest recognition of scholarly work in the real estate discipline. In 2013 the International Real Estate Association awarded him their Achievement Award, this recognizing outstanding achievement in real estate research at the international level. He currently has faculty status at the Weimer School of Advanced Studies in Real Estate and Land Economics, this part of the Homer Hoyt Institute. He has served as co-editor of the Journal of the American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association and is currently is on the editorial boards of six real estate journals. He has published 70 articles in peer reviewed journals including the Quarterly Journal of Economics, Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Real Estate Economics and Finance, Journal of Housing Economics, Journal of Urban Economics, and Real Estate Economics. He also has published over 20 book chapters and other articles. His research has been cited in over 1,000 other academic studies. Dr. Haurin’s current research interests focus on issues in housing, real estate economics, and urban economics. These interests include the study of housing affordability and the impact of housing quality on children. His current funding is from the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Social Security Administration for the study of reverse mortgages.

    Email: haurin.2@osu.edu

  • Joe Heimlich, Professor Emeritus
    Extension, Columbus campus
  • William Heward, Professor Emeritus
    Physical Activity and Educational Services, Columbus campus
  • Donald Hubin, Professor Emeritus
    Philosophy, Columbus campus
  • John Hughes, Associate Professor Emeritus
    Molecular Virology, Immunology, and Medical Genetics, Columbus campus
  • David Jacobs, Professor Emeritus
    Sociology, Columbus campus
  • Mari R. Jones, Professor Emeritus
    Psychology, Columbus campus
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    Mari R. Jones

    Mari Riess Jones joined the Department of Psychology in 1968 (as a visiting Assistant Professor) in an era when there were few women faculty at The Ohio State University (or other universities). Eventually, she was promoted, tenured, and became a full professor in 1976.

    Throughout her academic career her interests centered on the role of time, synchrony and rhythm in attention and memory. This  focus  upon time and the time structure of events  people encounter challenged the main tenants of cognitive psychology which was based upon an information processing formulation which endorsed a view of time as basis for processing and encoding information and not as basis for synchronization of attending.

    Early publications aimed to establish a role for event time structure in guiding the attending of listeners using simple musical events. Contrary to conventional views, this research revealed that people were best at judging components of a melody that occur at expected time points (versus unexpected ones). Research along these lines permitted development of more rigorous models of attending outlined in three major papers in Psychological Review (1976, 1989; 1999) among many other papers.

    As most of her research has focused upon perception of music-like events, she has played a leading role in the Society of Music Perception and Cognition as a board member and President; also receiving this society’s Life Time Achievement award. Other awards from Ohio State include the Joan Huber Research Award for Outstanding Scholarship and the Fred Brown Award (from the Psychology Department). Professor Jones retired from The Ohio State University to spend time writing a book.

    Email: jones.80@osu.edu

  • Tom Kasulis, Professor Emeritus
    Comparative Studies, Columbus campus
  • Keith Kilty, Professor Emeritus
    Social Work, Columbus campus
  • John N. King, Distinguished University Professor Emeritus
    English, Columbus campus
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    John N. King

    John N. King is Distinguished University Professor Emeritus and Arts and Humanities Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English and of Religious Studies at The Ohio State University. He is an affiliate of OSU’s Center for the Study of Religion and Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. In addition, he is Senior Research Fellow at Rare Book School in Charlottesville, VA, and Scholar-in-Residence at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC. His expertise encompasses Renaissance literature and culture, Reformation literary and cultural history, the history of the book, manuscript studies, and iconography. His books include English Reformation Literature: The Tudor Origins of the Protestant Tradition; Tudor Royal Iconography: Literature and Art in an Age of Religious Crisis; Spenser's Poetry and the Reformation Tradition; Milton and Religious Controversy: Satire and Polemic in Paradise Lost; Voices of the English Reformation: A Sourcebook; Foxe’s Book of Martyrs and Early Modern English Print Culture; Tudor Books and Readers: 1485-1603; and Henry VIII and His Afterlives. He is the recipient of a residency at the Rockefeller Foundation Study Center at Bellagio, Italy, and fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies, Bibliographical Society of America, Folger Shakespeare Library, John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, Henry E. Huntington Library, Lilly Endowment in conjunction with the National Humanities Center, National Endowment for the Humanities, and Renaissance Society of America. He has directed many National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminars for College and University Teachers (1990 to 2014).

    Email: king.2@osu.edu

  • Charles Klopp, Professor Emeritus
    French and Italian, Columbus campus
  • George Krakowka, Professor Emeritus
    Veterinary Biosciences, Columbus campus
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    George Krakowka

    Summary: The best way to summarize 37 years (1974 to 2013) of active research as a faculty member of The Ohio State University is to identify scholarly contributions by infectious agents. As well, three co-authored books on veterinary immunology and viral infectious diseases were written and the position of North American editor, Veterinary Immunology and Immuno-pathology was held for 13 years (1987-2000).

    1973-1988: A total of 78 peer-reviewed publications on canine distemper virus (CDV) and related viral diseases of dogs were published. The most important contributions were: CDV strains varied in neurovirulence, immunosuppressive effects of CDV upon developing immunity was a critical determinant of neurovirulence and identification of the canine natural killer (NK) cell. As well, work with X-SCIDs germfree dogs demonstrated that the defect per se was not lethal and that X-SCIDs dogs could be reconstituted with either canine or human CD34+ bone marrow stem cells.

    1987-1998: A total of 49 peer-reviewed publications were published on Helicobacter pylori, a human gastric pathogen and other gastric bacterial pathogens. The most important contributions were: Demonstration that this bacterium caused type A gastritis (Koch’s postulates), development of successful anti-microbial therapies for bacterial gastritis in germfree piglets and identification of Helicobacter pylori-like organisms in (HPLO) porcine stomachs.

    1999-present: A total of 60 peer-reviewed publications were devoted to the most important viral infectious disease of modern swine production, porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and post-weaning multi-systemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). The most significant contributions to this field were: Proof for the concept that induction of PMWS by PCV2 requires that action(s) of co-factors (usually immune stimulation) for full disease expression, the identification of certain widely-used swine bacterin formulations had an unanticipated potentiating effect on PCV2/PMWS and the identification of a three amino acid segment in within the second immunogenic epitope of the nucleocapsid protein is critical for virulence.

    2008-2011: A total of 6 publications concern the topic of porcine torque teno viruses (TTVs). The most significant contributions to this field were: Established a link between TTV infection and a reproducible spectrum of gross and histologic lesions in young swine, recognition that TTV potentiates mortality rates for both PCV2 and also porcine reproductive and respiratory virus syndrome (PRRSV) viruses and that TTV DNAs (and very likely infectious TTVs) are present in commercial swine bacterins.

    2012-present: The last several years have been devoted to developing a germfree piglet model of human norovirus infection and vaccination/challenge studies with two newly emergent and lethal porcine coronavirus infections, PEDV and PdCV.

    1973-present: Finally, over 100 peer-reviewed publications have addressed general or specific topics in Veterinary immunology and pathology.

    Email: krakowka.1@osu.edu

  • Patti A. Lather, Professor Emeritus
    Educational Studies, Columbus campus
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    Patti A. Lather

    Since July 2014, Dr. Patti Lather is Professor Emerita in Educational Studies at Ohio State University with courtesy appointments in the Gender and Sexuality Studies and Comparative Studies at Ohio State. Beginning in 1988, Dr. Lather taught qualitative research, feminist methodology and gender and education at Ohio State University. Her articles on feminist methodology, qualitative research and gender and education are published in leading disciplinary and interdisciplinary journals. She has authored five books: Getting Smart: Feminist Research and Pedagogy With/in the Postmodern (1991 Critics Choice Award), Troubling the Angels: Women Living with HIV/AIDS, co-authored with Chris Smithies (1998 CHOICE Outstanding Academic Title), Getting Lost: Feminist Efforts Toward a Double(d) Science (2008 Critics Choice Award), Engaging (Social) Science: Policy from the Side of the Messy (2011 Critics Choice Award), and (Post)Critical Methodologies: The Science Possible After the Critiques: The Selected Work of Patti Lather, in press with Routledge. Her current research is focused around cultural studies of numeracy and the uses of Walter Benjamin in a materialist cultural analysis of sports and U.S. secondary schooling.

    Dr. Lather has lectured widely in international and national contexts and held a number of distinguished visiting lectureships. She has held visiting positions at the University of British Columbia, Goteborg University, York University, and the Danish Pedagogy Institute as well as a 1995 sabbatical appointment, Humanities Research Institute, University of California-Irvine, seminar on feminist research methodology. She was the recipient of a 1989 Fulbright to New Zealand and a 1993 OSU Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching. She is a 2009 inductee of the American Educational Research Association Fellows, a 2010 recipient of the AERA Division B Lifetime Achievement Award and a 2015 recipient of the International Congress of Qualitative Inquiry Lifetime Achievement Award.  Dr. Lather received her BA in English from South Dakota State University (1970), her MA in American Studies from Purdue (1972), and her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction from Indiana University (1983). Prior to OSU, she taught for five years in women’s studies at Mankato State University.

    Email: lather.1@osu.edu

  • Carl V. Leier, Professor Emeritus
    Internal Medicine, Columbus campus
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    Carl V. Leier

    I served as The Overstreet Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine and former Director of the Cardiovascular division (1986-1998) at The Ohio State University College of Medicine (1976-2012). While I've performed research in various areas of Cardiovascular Medicine, my focus has been on Heart Failure, Heart Transplant and Cardiovascular Pharmacology. I've published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and over 150 invited articles, editorials and chapters. Over the years, I've served as a research mentor for students, residents, grad students and Cardiovascular Fellows.

    Email: carl.leier@osumc.edu

  • Joan R. Leitzel, Professor Emeritus
    Mathematics, Columbus campus
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    Joan R. Leitzel

    Joan R. Leitzel was a Professor of Mathematics at Ohio State and moved into administration as Associate Provost for Curriculum and Instruction.  In 1990 she went to the National Science Foundation as a division director, and then to the University of Nebraska as Senior Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost.  She then became President of the University of New Hampshire.  She retired in 2002 and returned to Columbus. 

    During her retirement Dr. Leitzel continues to be engaged with her field of mathematics and with higher education issues and institutions.  She has chaired the Mathematical Sciences Education Board at the National Research Council and also the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences.  In 2008-09 she returned to Ohio State full time to lead the restructuring of Arts and Sciences.   In 2013 she chaired the Steering Committee formed by the Ohio Board of Regents to craft goals and a process for updating undergraduate mathematics programs at Ohio’s postsecondary institutions, an initiative now led by the chairpersons of those departments.    In the last two years she has testified twice before Ohio legislative committees against bills to withdraw from the Common Core Standards, and she continues to meet periodically with the Ohio Standards Coalition and the Ohio Mathematics and Science Coalition.  At the national level she has served and continues to serve on several national committees during her retirement, including the NCES Project to Assess Algebraic Reasoning, the MAA Strategic Planning Committee, various NSF proposal review panels and program reviews, and APLU’s Advisory Board for the Mathematics Teacher Education Partnership.  She currently is a member of the national advisory board for the Association for Women in Mathematics and the national advisory board for the Command, Control, and Interoperability Center for Advanced Data Analysis at Rutgers.

    In 2014, Dr. Leitzel received the Gung and Hu Award for Distinguished Service to Mathematics from the Mathematical Association of America, and in 2015 she received the Friend of Mathematics Award from the Ohio Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

    Email: joan.leitzel@unh.edu

  • Elizabeth R. Lenz, Professor Emeritus
    College of Nursing, Columbus campus
  • Roy J. Lewicki, Professor Emeritus
    Fisher College of Business Management & Human Resources, Columbus campus
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    Roy J. Lewicki

    Roy J. Lewicki is the Irving Abramowitz Professor of Business Ethics and Professor of Management and Human Resources Emeritus at the Max M. Fisher College of Business, The Ohio State University. He has a B.A. degree from Dartmouth College and a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Columbia University. Prof. Lewicki maintains research and teaching interests in the fields of negotiation, conflict management and dispute resolution, trust development, managerial leadership, organizational justice and ethical decision making, and has published many research articles and book chapters on these topics. He is a Fellow of the Academy of Management and the Organizational Behavior Teaching Society. He is the author/editor of 40 books, including Negotiation (Lewicki, Barry and Saunders, 2014) and Essentials of Negotiation, (Lewicki, Saunders, Barry, 2015)—the leading academic textbooks on negotiation—and Mastering Business Negotiations (Lewicki and Hiam, 2007), a book for managers.

    Email: lewicki.1@osu.edu

  • Kamran Majidzadeh, Professor Emeritus
    Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering, Columbus campus
  • Howard Marcum, Professor Emeritus
    Mathematics, Columbus campus
  • Judith Mayne, Professor Emeritus
    French and Italian, Columbus campus
  • Jeredith Merrin, Professor Emeritus
    English, Columbus campus
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    Jeredith Merrin

    Jeredith Merrinbrought up in the Pacific Northwest, on the old Oregon Trailtook her MA in English (specializing in Chaucer), followed by a Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley in Anglo-American Poetry and Poetics.  CUP, a special honoree in the 2013 Able Muse Book Award, is her third collection; her previous books, Shift and Bat Ode, appeared in the University of Chicago Press Phoenix Poets series.  She’s authored an influential book of criticism on Marianne Moore and Elizabeth Bishop, and her reviews and essays (on Moore, Bishop, Clare, Mew, Amichai, and others) have appeared in The Southern Review and elsewhere.  Her poems may be found in such journals as Ploughshares, Slate, The Southern Poetry Review, The Virginia Quarterly Review, and The Yale Review.  A retired Professor of English (The Ohio State University), she lives near Phoenix, Arizona, and is currently completing a chapbook, having to do with owls.

    Email: merrin.1@osu.edu

  • Terry A. Miller, Ohio Eminent Scholar Professor Emeritus, Chair
    Chemistry and Biochemistry, Columbus campus
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    Terry A. Miller

    Terry Miller obtained his undergraduate degree in chemistry from the University of Kansas. After receiving his Ph.D. from Cambridge University on a Marshall Scholarship, he went to Bell Laboratories where he became a Distinguished Member of Technical Staff. Thereafter he moved to The Ohio State University as the first Ohio Eminent Scholar Professor. He has held visiting faculty appointments at Princeton University, Stanford University, and the Institute for Molecular Science in Japan. Dr. Miller's research centers on the spectroscopic identification, characterization and monitoring of reactive and/or trace chemical species.  He has developed numerous highly sensitive, spectroscopic techniques spanning frequencies from the microwave to the ultraviolet.  Presently, his work focuses upon laser induced fluorescence and cavity ringdown spectroscopy of reactive intermediates. These intermediates play critical roles in a variety of processes of interest to our society and economy, including combustion, atmospheric chemistry, and plasma processing of electronic devices. The spectra of these species serve as key diagnostics to monitor their chemical reactions and characterize their geometric and electronic structures. He is author of more than 350 scientific publications. His research has been recognized with the Meggars Award (Optical Society of America), the Bomem-Michaelson Award (Coblentz Society), the Bourke Medal (Royal Society of Chemistry), the Broida Prize and Plyler Prize (American Physical Society), the Morley Prize (Cleveland Section of the American Chemical Society) and the Ioannes Marcus Marci Medal (Czechoslavak Spectroscopic Society). He has been granted the recognition of Fellow by the American Chemical Society, American Physical Society, Optical Society of America and American Association for the Advancement of Science. He presently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy and for 22 years was Chair of the International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy which annually attracts approximately 500 conferees. He sits on several other journal editorial boards and conference program committees, and currently chairs the Advisory Committee for the International Free Radicals Symposium.

    Email: miller.104@osu.edu

  • Richard Moore, Professor Emeritus
    Environment and Natural Resources, Columbus campus
  • Anne Morganstern, Professor Emeritus
    History of Art, Columbus campus
  • James Morganstern, Professor Emeritus
    History of Art, Columbus campus
  • Hazel A. Morrow-Jones, Professor Emeritus
    City and Regional Planning, Columbus campus
  • Jack Nasar, Professor Emeritus
    Architecture, Columbus campus
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    Jack Nasar

    Jack L. Nasar (PhD, FAICP) is a Professor Emeritus City & Regional Planning, The Ohio State University, and former editor of the Journal of Planning Literature. An environmental psychologist, urban planner, and urban designer, he has published more than 90 scholarly articles on environmental meaning, cognition, fear, crime, and spatial behavior. He served as architectural critic for The Columbus Dispatch and for Landscape Architecture magazine.  He wrote two books (Design by Competition: Making Design Competitions Work, Cambridge, 1999; and The Evaluative Image of the City, Sage, 1998), and edited four more (Designing for Designers: Lessons Learned from Schools of Architecture, Fairchild, 2007; Universal Design and Visitability: From Accessibility to Zoning, 2007, Directions in Person-Environment Research and Practice. Ethnoscapes, 1999, and Environmental Aesthetics: Theory, Research, and Applications, Cambridge, 1988). With students, he has developed more than 60 neighborhood plans, post-occupancy evaluations, and visual quality programs. An invited lecturer around the world, his honors include the Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA) Career Award, Lumley Award for Excellence in Research, the EDRA Achievement award, Ethel Chattel Fellowship, Fellow American Institute of Certified Planners, and the Distinguished Alumni Award from the School of Architecture at Washington University, St. Louis.

    Dr. Nasar has a Bachelor in Architecture from the University of Washington in St. Louis, a Master’s in Urban Planning from New York University, a Certificate in planning from University of Manchester, and a Ph.D. in Man-Environment Relations from Pennsylvania State University.

    Email: nasar.1@osu.edu

  • Ardine Nelson, Professor Emeritus
    Art, Columbus campus
  • Stephan Pentak, Professor Emeritus
    Art, Columbus campus
  • Bradley M. Peterson, Professor Emeritus
    Astronomy, Columbus campus
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    Bradley M. Peterson

    Dr. Bradley M. Peterson was a member of the faculty of The Ohio State University from 1980 to 2015. He served as Chair of the Department of Astronomy from 2006 to 2015. He is currently on appointment as Distinguished Visiting Astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, Maryland.

    Dr. Peterson primary research interests are quasars, or "active galactic nuclei" (AGNs), and the supermassive black holes that power them. He is an active user of both ground-based and space-based telescopes. He is known principally for development of the technique of "reverberation mapping," which makes use of the intrinsic brightness variability of AGNs to map their inner structure and determine their black hole masses. He is currently the Principal Investigator for the AGN Space Telescope and Optical Reverberation Mapping project (AGN STORM), which is a multi-satellite and multi-telescope observing campaign built around a large allocation of Hubble Space Telescope observing time.

    Dr. Peterson is a member of the NASA Advisory Council and chairs the Council's Science Committee. He is also co-chair of the Science and Technology Definition Team for the Large Ultraviolet, Optical, and Infrared Surveyor (LUVOIR), a potential large high-technology telescope concept for the 2030s.

    Dr. Peterson has authored or co-authored over 230 research papers and two textbooks on astrophysics. He is an elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and in 2010 received a Distinguished Scholar Award from the University. He received his PhD in Astronomy from the University of Arizona in 1978. He earned his bachelor's degree in Physics in 1974 from the University of Minnesota, from which he also received an Outstanding Achievement Award in 2016.

    Email: peterson.12@osu.edu

  • Russell Pitzer, Professor Emeritus
    Chemistry, Columbus campus
  • David Porretta, Professor Emeritus
    Adapted Physical Activity, Columbus campus
  • Karlis Racevskis, Professor Emeritus
    French and Italian, Columbus campus
  • Jack Rall, Professor Emeritus
    Physiology and Cell Biology, Columbus campus
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    Jack Rall

    Jack A. Rall received a Ph.D. in physiology from the University of Iowa, did post-doctoral training at UCLA and later spent a sabbatical year in the physiology department at University College London.  He retired from the department of physiology and cell biology after thirty eight years at OSU in 2012.  He returned for one year to continue as the OSU faculty ombudsman.  During his career he was active in basic research on various aspects of muscle contraction.  Since his retirement he is no longer involved in laboratory research but rather his scholarly interests have concentrated on investigating historical aspects of muscle physiology and physiology in general.  He has written a monograph entitled: “Mechanism of Muscular Contraction” (Springer, pages 1 - 471, 2014) that is part of the Perspectives in Physiology series of the American Physiological Society.  Most recently his article entitled: “The XIIIth International Physiological Congress in Boston in 1929: American Physiology Comes of Age” (in Advances in Physiology Education, 40: 5 – 16, 2016) has received the 2016 Orr E. Reynolds Award from the American Physiological Society for the best historical article by a member of the society.  Professor Emeritus Rall is a member of the inaugural class of the OSU Emeritus Academy.

    Email: rall.1@osu.edu

  • Alan Randall, Professor Emeritus
    Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics, Columbus campus
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    Alan Randall

    Alan Randall is a Professor Emeritus of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at The Ohio State University and an Honorary Professor of Economics at the University of Sydney in Australia. Alan was a professor at Ohio State for 25 years, 12 of them as AEDE Department Chair, and retired in 2010. He specializes in environmental economics and policy, with particular interests in environmental risk; biodiversity, habitat and environmental sustainability; environmental regulation, monitoring, and enforcement; and the benefits and costs of environmental projects and programs. In addition, he maintains modest sidelines in environmental ethics and research methodology. After serving as Professor and Head of Agricultural and Resource Economics at the University of Sydney in Australia, 2011-2014, he returned to central Ohio. In 2015 he began a small part-time appointment with the Sustainable and Resilient Economy Discovery Theme at Ohio State.

    Alan has published quite a bit, received a handful of awards and recognitions and a couple of honorary doctorates, and completed his share of funded projects and consulting assignments. He is a fellow of three professional associations and a recent president of the Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.

    Email: randall.3@osu.edu

  • J. William Rich, Professor Emeritus
    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Columbus campus
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    J. William Rich

    J. William “Bill” Rich obtained the B.S. in Mechnical Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University, and the Master of Aeronautical Engineering degree from the University of Virginia. He has the M.A. and Ph.D. from Princeton University, where he was a Daniel and Florence Guggenheim Fellow.  Prior to coming to The Ohio State University, he was a Principal Engineer and Head of the Physics and Chemistry Section at Cornell Aeronautical Laboratory (now, Calspan Corporation). At The Ohio State University, he held the Ralph W. Kurtz Chair, and founded the Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics Laboratory in the Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. He has been an Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and has held visiting faculty appointments at Carnegie Mellon University and Ecole Centrale Paris, where he was a senior Fullbright Fellow.  Dr. Rich's scholarly interests centers on theoretical and experimental research into chemically-reacting flows, gas phase molecular energy transfer processes, nonequilibrium gas dynamics, ionized gas processes, and high-energy lasers.  He is the inventor of the electrically excited supersonic flow CO laser, and of processes for separating stable isotopes in nonequilibrium reacting flows. He has developed methods of sustaining atmospheric-pressure electric discharges in cold molecular gases, with inhibition of electron attachment in oxygen-containing gases. He holds 8 U.S. Patents, and is the author of more than 200 journal papers and scientific reports in these fields. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the recipient of the 2008 Plasmadynamics and Lasers Award from the AIAA.

    Email: rich.2@osu.edu

  • Laurel Richardson, Professor Emeritus
    Sociology, Columbus campus
  • Virginia Richardson, Professor Emeritus
    Social Work, Columbus campus
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    Virginia Richardson

    Virginia Richardson received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1980 and was a full professor in the College of Social Work at The Ohio State University where she also had a courtesy appointment with the Department of African American and African Studies. She also served as the Director of Aging Research for The Ohio State University’s Transdisciplinary Program in Aging and as President of the Association for Gerontological Education in Social Work (AGE-SW). She co-authored and published a book, Gerontological Practice for the Twenty-first Century, with Columbia University Press in 2006 and serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including the Gerontologist and the Journal of Gerontological Social Work.  Her most recent research has focused on caregiving among minority groups as well as on bereavement in late life.  She was the PI for a project funded by the Coca Cola Critical Difference for Women focusing on perceptions of dementia caregivers among minority groups.  In a symposium at the conference for The Gerontological Society of America last November, she organized presentations on dementia caregiving focusing on four different ethnic groups: African Americans, Hispanics, S. Koreans, and rural older persons. In addition, at the last annual meeting of the Council on Social Work Education she presented a paper on “Critical feminist gerontology: Application to persons living alone with Alzheimer’s Disease.” She currently is a Co-PI of a grant funded by The Innovative Community Academic Partnership (iCAP) entitled, “Senior Companion Program Plus (SCP Plus) for Dementia Caregivers,” which is a culturally tailored, psychoeducational training designed for senior companions from African American backgrounds. Preliminary results from this work were presented at the 2015 conference of the Gerontological Society of America. Her most recent publications include a paper, “How does bereavement get under the skin? The effects of late life spousal loss on cortisol levels,” published in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences; and an article entitled, “ A multi-level perspective on gender differences in the relationship between poverty status and depression among older adults in the United States,” published the Journal of Women and Aging.

    Email: richardson.2@osu.edu

  • John M. Robinson, Professor Emeritus
    Physiology and Cell Biology, Columbus campus
  • Ileana Rodriguez, Professor Emeritus
    Spanish and Portuguese, Columbus campus
  • Nancy Rogers, Professor Emeritus
    Law, Columbus campus
  • Duane W. Roller, Professor Emeritus
    Classics, Lima campus
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    Duane W. Roller

    I received my Ph. D. in Classical Archaeology from Harvard University in 1971, after a BA in Letters and MA in Latin from the University of Oklahoma. Since then, I have been the author of nearly 200 scholarly articles and 12 books, including Cleopatra: A Biography (Oxford 2010) and Ancient Geography (London 2015). Publications have appeared in journals such as the American Journal of Archaeology, Journal of Hellenic Studies, L'antiquité classique, and Echoes du monde classique. I have participated in or directed archaeological excavations and surveys in Greece, Italy, Turkey, Israel, Jordan, and northwestern Africa, and have been the recipient of four Fulbright Awards for teaching in India, Poland, Malta, and Austria. I have also received grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Geographic Society. While at Ohio State I directed a number of PhD dissertations and MA theses.

    My current research is directed largely toward ancient geography and exploration, as well as the role of women in antiquity. I am currently engaged in a book titled Royal Women of the Augustan Age, under contract to Oxford University Press. In addition to these interests, I have published a number of articles on opera and the classics, in particular as it pertains to Richard Wagner, in journals such as Ars Musica Denver and Euphrosyne.

    After leaving Ohio State in 2007, I was Karl-Franzens Distinguished Professor of Cultural Studies at the University of Graz in Austria, in 2008. I am currently living in Santa Fe, NM, and pursuing an active program of research, as well as travelling throughout the US giving public lectures, particularly on the topic of Cleopatra.

    Email: roller.2@osu.edu

  • Lois A. Rosow, Professor Emeritus
    Music, Columbus campus
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    Lois A. Rosow

    Lois Rosow retired as Professor of Music in 2014. She headed the Musicology Area of the School of Music for eighteen years, and currently serves as a part-time administrator for that area. She received her B.A. from Oberlin College and her Ph.D. from Brandeis University. Her research is focused mainly on European music of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. She is an authority on French opera of that period, with particular interest in text-music relations, allegorical meaning, music printing and engraving, performance-practice issues, and the administrative history and scribal workshop of the Paris Opera. Her critical edition of Armide by Jean-Baptiste Lully (Olms, 2003), completed with a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, has served for productions released on audio CD (Naxos, 2008) and DVD (FRA musica, 2011). She has published in the Journal of the American Musicological Society, Early Music, the Cambridge Opera Journal, The New Grove Dictionary of Opera, The Cambridge History of Seventeenth-Century Music, and various anthologies, among them Lully Studies (Cambridge, 2000) and New Perspectives on Marc-Antoine Charpentier (Ashgate, 2010).  She served as guest editor of a special issue of the Journal of Seventeenth-Century Music (10:1, 2004), devoted to Lully’s opera Persée, and was recently appointed Editor-in-Chief of JSCM. She has served as president of the Society for Seventeenth-Century Music and on the Board of Directors of the American Musicological Society.

    Email: rosow.1@osu.edu

  • Sally V. Rudmann, Professor Emeritus
    School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Columbus campus
  • Thomas Santner, Professor Emeritus
    Statistics, Columbus campus
  • Paul Sciulii, Professor Emeritus
    Anthropology, Columbus campus
  • Grayce Sills, Professor Emeritus
    Nursing, Columbus campus
  • Rajendra Singh, Professor Emeritus
    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Columbus campus
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    Rajendra Singh

    Dr. Raj Singh retired as professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace engineering in June 2014 after completing 35 years of service. He held the distinguished Donald D. Glower Chair in Engineering for 14 years.  During 1987- 1988, he was a visiting professor at the University of California at Berkley and in 2003, Dr. Singh served as President of the Institute of Noise Control Engineering (INCE/USA). During the retirement, Dr. Singh directs the NSF Smart Vehicle Concepts Center while actively pursuing scholarly and sponsored research in the areas of machine dynamics, acoustics, vibration, non-linear dynamics, and signal processing. He is internationally recognized as a leading expert on machinery noise and vibration control with applications to vehicles and geared systems. He regularly teaches intense short courses to practicing engineers and has provided consulting services to over 50 industrial and R&D organizations. Additionally, he serves as the Vice President of Technical Activities for the International Institute of Noise Control Engineering and sits on several editorial boards including the Journal of Sound and Vibration, Applied Acoustics, and Journal of Mechanical Engineering Science.

    Dr. Singh has successfully advised 42 PhD students, 73 MS students, and 48 BS Honors students.  He has published over 450 papers including 227 journal articles, nine books or special journal issues (edited), and one patent.  Dr. Singh has been elected to the rank of Fellow in 4 professional societies, namely the Acoustical Society of America, American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Society of Automotive Engineers, and INCE/USA.  He has received several national awards including the prestigious American Society for Engineering Education’s Ralph Coats Roe Award for Outstanding Mechanical Engineering Educator, "Outstanding Mechanical Engineer" Award from the Purdue University, Outstanding Distance Learning Faculty Award from General Motors, the ASEE Westinghouse Award for “Distinguished Contributions to Teaching”, and the INCE Award for “Excellence in Teaching”.  Ohio State's College of Engineering also conferred seven Faculty Research Awards as well as the Harrison Faculty Award for Excellence in Engineering Education.

    Email: singh.3@osu.edu

  • Kazimierz Slomczynski, Professor Emeritus
    Sociology, Columbus campus
  • Ronald Solomon, Professor Emeritus
    Mathematics, Columbus campus
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    Ronald Solomon

    Ron Solomon grew up in New York City and earned his PhD at Yale University in 1971. After a postdoc at the University of Chicago and a one-year research visit at Rutgers University, he joined the faculty of Ohio State in 1975. Ron received an OSU Faculty Service Award in 1993 and an Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1997. He has enjoyed a long and fulfilling research collaboration and friendship with Richard Lyons of Rutgers University with whom he has co-authored six research monographs with a seventh in the works. Ron has supervised six fine PhD students at OSU, one of whom, Radha Kessar, was a co-recipient of the Berwick Prize of the London Mathematical Society in 2009. In 2006, Ron received the Levi Conant Prize of the American Mathematical Society (A.M.S.) for his article, “A brief history of the classification of finite simple groups,” and in 2012 he shared the Steele Prize for Mathematical Exposition of the A.M.S. for co-authoring the book, “The Classification of Finite Simple Groups: Groups of Characteristic 2 Type.” In 2013, he was named a Fellow of the A.M.S. Ron is the proud father of Ari and Michael, proud father-in-law of Ariana and grandfather of Sofia, and the very happy and proud husband of Rose.

    Email: solomon.1@osu.edu

  • Albert Soloway, Professor Emeritus
    Pharmacy, Columbus campus
  • Anna Soter, Professor Emeritus
    Teaching and Learning, Columbus campus
  • Elizabeth Stasny, Professor Emeritus
    Statistics, Columbus campus
  • Richard H. Steckel, Professor Emeritus
    Economics, Columbus campus
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    Richard H. Steckel

    Richard H. Steckel is a Distinguished University Professor and a pioneer of anthropometric history, a field that employs height, weight, and even skeletal remains to understand the evolution of human health. He has published 5 books and over 100 articles in major peer-reviewed journals, and his research has been discussed as a feature article in TIME. Reports on his work have also appeared in Science, The Economist, the New York Times, the Washington Post, Der Spiegel, NPR, Dutch radio, and other major news outlets. He has been invited to speak over 50 times in the past decade at conferences and universities, including an appearance as plenary speaker at the 2011 DOHaD (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease) conference. Two major strands of his research include the health of African Americans under slavery and freedom, and the evolution of health since the Neolithic Revolution.

    Email: steckel.1@osu.edu

  • Tod Stuessy, Professor Emeritus
    Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology, Columbus campus
  • Nawal Taneja, Professor Emeritus
    Aviation, Columbus campus
  • Olli Tuovinen, Professor Emeritus
    Microbiology, Columbus campus
  • J. Marshall Unger, Professor Emeritus
    East Asian Languages and Literatures, Columbus campus
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    J. Marshall Unger

    J. Marshall Unger, now emeritus professor of Japanese, chaired academic departments at the University of Hawai'i, University of Maryland, and the Ohio State University from 1988 to 2004. He has been a visiting professor/researcher at Kobe University, Tsukuba University, the University of Tokyo, the National Museum for Ethnography in Senri, and the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL) in Tachikawa. Among his research grants have been fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, Ford Foundation, and Japan Foundation (twice). He is the author of Studies in Early Japanese Morphophonemics (1977, 2nd ed. 1993), The Fifth Generation Fallacy (1987, Japanese ed. 1992), Literacy and Script Reform in Occupation Japan (1996, Japanese ed. 2001), Ideogram: Chinese Characters and the Myth of Disembodied Meaning (2004), The Role of Contact in the Origins of the Japanese and Korean Languages (2009), and Sangaku Proofs: A Japanese Mathematician at Work (2015). Unger led the team that produced A Framework for Introductory Japanese Language Curricula in American High Schools and Colleges in 1993 as part of a joint College Board-NEH project coordinated by the National Foreign Language Center. His articles and reviews have appeared in such fora as Language, Word, Diachronica, Journal of Japanese Studies, Monumenta Nipponica, Journal of Asian Studies, Japanese Language & Literature, Journal of the American Oriental Society, and Modern Language Journal, and he has been invited to speak in Japan, China, Taiwan, Korea, Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, Germany, Denmark, Austria, and Belgium, as well as at many events in the United States.

    Email: unger.26@osu.edu

  • Altaf A. Wani, Professor Emeritus
    Radiology, Columbus campus
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    Altaf A. Wani

    Dr. Wani is highly active in basic and applied research, exhaustively exploring and developing newer paradigms in the realm of molecular oncology, and dissemination of the latest and evolving concepts in the class room setting as well as diverse national and international forums. Over the years, Wani lab has primarily delved in understanding the nature and repercussions of deleterious interactions of xenobiotics and the genome, trace the individual and coordinated response events in diverse normal as well as cancer cells and most importantly delineate the underlying mechanistic basis of their role in disease pathogenesis. His work continues to dissect the processing of genomic lesions and unravel the cross-talk among closely related network of pathways with the aim of developing intervention strategies for disease elimination. Dr. Wani devotes considerable effort in mentoring younger students and scientists as well as serving the global scientific enterprise at multiple levels.

    Email: wani.2@osu.edu

  • Julia Watson, Professor Emeritus
    Comparative Studies, Columbus campus
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    Julia Watson

    Since Fall 2014 Julia Watson is professor emerita in Comparative Studies, an interdisciplinary, PhD-granting department in the Arts & Humanities division of the College of Arts and Sciences, where her focus was in the Comparative Literature track. (Other tracks in the unit are Folklore, Religious Studies, American and Ethnic Studies, and Science and Technology in the Humanities.) Watson’s area of expertise is autobiography studies, a field in which she remains active internationally and has several ongoing projects.

    With co-author Sidonie Smith, Watson has published Reading Autobiography: A Guide for Interpreting Life Narratives (expanded edition, 2010), a leading theoretical text in the field that has sold over twelve-thousand copies. They have also introduced and co-edited five books.  A collection of 22 of their essays, Life Writing in the Long Run, has just been issued by Michigan Publishing and is available in print, e-book,and open-access versions.  Watson has also published many solo essays on life narrative and a book of poems, In the Whirlwind. Retirement has enabled her not only to develop her research projects but to enjoy time with her two young grandchildren in Columbus and to travel internationally.

    Smith and Watson have also published several influential essays in the field, including: "Virtually Me: A Toolbox about Online Self-Presentation" (in Identity Technologies: Constructing the Self Online, 2013; short version republished in the Chronicle of Higher Education); “What about False Witnessing? The Limits of Authenticity and Verification” (Routledge Companion to Human Rights and Literature, 2015); and "The Rumpled Bed of Autobiography: Extravagant Lives, Extravagant Questions" (Biography, 2001). Watson has also published essays in several areas of life writing including, recently, contemporary memoir (“Patti Smith Kicks in the Walls of Memoir: Relational Lives and “the Right Voice” inJust Kids,” for a/b: Auto/Biography Studies, 2015); graphic memoir (“’Our Selves Were All We Had:’ Parsing the Autobiographical in Fun Home,” forthcoming for the Modern Languages Association); autoethnography (“Strategic Autoethnography and American Ethnicity Debates: The Metrics of Authenticity in When I Was Puerto Rican,” for Life Writing, 2013); and posthumanism (“Visual Diary as Prosthetic Practice in Bobby Baker’s Diary DrawingsBiography, 2012).

    In February 2016 she gave three invited lectures in Germany: “How to Read Autobiographical Narration,” Forum für Literaturwissenschaftliche Japanforschung, Free University, Berlin; “Miriam Katin’s Autographics and Jewish Women’s Life Writing,” Zentrum für Jüdische Studien, Berlin; and "Self-Presentation and “Authenticity" in American Life Writing,” Annual Meeting of the Historians in the German Association of American Studies, Tutzing. With Sidonie Smith in September 2015 she gave conference papers at King’s College, London, and at the Paris Ouest FAAAM Colloquium.

    Since 2010 Watson has served as an outside evaluator (for dissertations, tenure or promotion) to: the Department of Gender Studies, Central European University, Budapest; the Faculty of Education, Humanities, and Law, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia; the Department of English, McMaster University, Canada; the Centre for Literary and Linguistic Computing, University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; the National University of Modern Languages, Islamabad, Pakistan; the Department of Scandinavian Studies, University of California, Berkeley; and the Department of English, University of Texas, Austin.  She is currently on the advisory or editorial boards of A/B: Auto/Biography Studies; Women’s Studies Quarterly; the Palgrave Studies in Life Writing Series; the Palgrave-St. Martin’s book series on “Literary Anthropology”; and the forthcoming three-volume Handbook of Autobiography/Autofiction, ed. Martina Wagner-Egelhaaf (de Gruyter). 

    Email: watson.235@osu.edu

  • Herbert Weisberg, Professor Emeritus
    Political Science, Columbus campus
  • Mary Ellen Wewers, Professor Emeritus
    Public Health, Columbus campus
  • William Wolfe, Professor Emeritus
    Civil, Environmental, and Geodetic Engineering, Columbus campus
  • Jackie D. Wood, Professor Emeritus
    SBS-Physiology and Cell Biology, Columbus campus
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    Jackie D. Wood

    Jackie D. Wood is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Physiology and Cell Biology in the Ohio State University College of Medicine. He received his doctorate in 1969 from the Department of Physiology and Biophysics at the University of Illinois and was appointed as Assistant Professor at the University of Kansas School of Medicine and MedicalCenter in1971 and promoted to Professor in 1979. He was appointed as Professor and Chairman in the Department of Physiology of the University of Nevada School of Medicine from 1979-85 and Professor and Chairman in the Department of Physiology and Professor of Internal Medicine in the Ohio State University College of Medicine in 1985-97. He was inducted as a Fellow of the American Gastroenterological Association in 2006

    Professor Wood is the author or co-author of more than 400 journal articles, abstracts, books and book chapters, with his recent work focussing on gut motility, enteric neuropathobiology, emerging concepts in neuro-gastroenterology, and enteric nervous control of digestive functions. He is on the editorial boards of a number of journals and foundations and is a frequent lecturer on neurogastroenterology, enteric neuro-immuno-physiology, and colitis and colon cancer in non-human primates.

    Professor Wood was the principal investigator for research grants from the National Institutes of Health continuously from 1971 to 2016. Most recent grant from the NIH was for the study of the function of the enteric nervous system. He works closely with the pharmaceutical industry and has received research funding from Sucampo Pharmaceuticals Inc., Takeda Pharmaceutical Co., Novartis Pharmaceuticals Inc., GlaxoSmithKline and Daiichi Sankyo, Co.  

    Professor Wood’s honors and awards include: NIH Career Development Award; Alexander von Humboldt Fellowship, Germany; University of Kansas Chancellor’s Award ($1000) for Excellence in Teaching; Professor-Of-The-Year Award, Medical Class of 1983, University of Nevada School of Medicine; The Ohio State University College of Medicine Excellence in Teaching Award; Mentors Research Scholar Award, American Gastroenterological Association; Hoffman-LaRoche Prize for research in gastrointestinal physiology; Honorary Citizen of the City of Atsugi, Japan; Distinguished Lecturer, World Congress of Gastroenterology, Sydney, Australia; Distinguished Faculty Appointment to the World Congress of Gastroenterology, Los Angeles, Ca; Annual Research Award from the Functional Brain-Gut Research Group; Merit Award (2008-$10,000) for excellence in research and teaching in the Ohio State University College of Medicine.  American Gastroenterological Association Mentor Award in 2016.

    Email: Jackie.Wood@osumc.edu

  • Bostwick F. Wyman, Professor Emeritus
    Mathematics, Columbus campus
  • Christian K. Zacher, Professor Emeritus
    English, Columbus campus
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    Christian Zacher is an emeritus professor of English whose scholarly work has focused on medieval literature, especially the literature of travel in the Middle Ages. He also is an authority on the Midwest and co-editor of an encyclopedia on the region.

    Wearing other hats, he has been an associate dean in Humanities. one of the inventors of a course about Ohio State, and Secretary of the University Senate.

  • Jacques Zakin, Professor Emeritus
    Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Columbus campus