Solar Eclipse

Solar Eclipse Resources from The Ohio State University

Resources for faculty, staff and students on all campuses.


Welcome to The Ohio State University's 2024 Solar Eclipse Resource Center.

On April 8, 2024, a total solar eclipse will cross North America, including a 124-mile-wide band in the state of Ohio. 

The path of totality is much larger than the 2017 eclipse, though Columbus is just south of the path. In Columbus and Newark, the eclipse will be partial and campuses will operate as usual. Lima, Mansfield, Marion and CFAES Wooster campuses are in the path of totality and will operate in a virtual and work from home environment on April 8.

Safety is the No. 1 priority, and all are encouraged to plan accordingly to ensure safe viewing and travel.


What should students, faculty and staff do on the day of the eclipse?
The Office of Academic Affairs encourages faculty and instructors who teach classes during the eclipse to, if appropriate, offer flexibility to students for this once-in-a-lifetime event.

Managers and their teams should work together to create a workplan that supports doing their best work – which can include location or time flexibility during the eclipse. With manager approval, eligible employees may also consider using paid time off. Learn more about flexible work guidance for managers.


Plan ahead for travel delays on April 8
Highways and local roadways throughout Ohio may experience higher than normal traffic volumes due to solar eclipse tourism-related traffic. Motorists are encouraged to anticipate traffic delays and allow for extra travel time, especially in the afternoon and evening hours on April 8.

Increased cellular usage may affect cell service in areas outside of major cities, so motorists should have a plan for alternate routes and use a printed map to access their destinations. Download Ohio Department of Transportation’s OHGO app to view real-time traffic info throughout Ohio.


 

2024 Solar Eclipse: Everything you need to know from an Ohio State astronomy professor


Logistics, Travel and Transportation Impacts

  • CFAES Wooster – Limited parking is available to visitors. Parking will begin at 8 a.m. through the main campus entrance (1680 Madison Ave, Wooster Ohio). All other entrances will be closed. Visitor parking is not permitted in the residential community areas. View CFAES Wooster campus information.
  • Columbus – Visit the CampusParc website for visitor parking information.
  • Lima - Campus parking lots and buildings will be closed on the day of the eclipse. View Lima area information.
  • Mansfield – Visitor parking is not permitted in the residential community areas.
  • Marion - Campus parking lots will be open to the community, however buildings will be closed. View Marion campus information.

Frequently Asked Questions

A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the earth, appearing to completely block the sun. At that time, the sky will completely darken for those in the “path of totality” – where the moon completely blocks the sun, leaving a shadow -- for up to 4 ½ minutes. Those not along the centerline of totality will experience a shorter period of darkness. These major astronomical events happen every few years somewhere on the planet, but they are rare to happen in a specific location: The next one to happen in Ohio is in September 2099.

Ohioans will be able to view the eclipse in the afternoon of April 8, 2024, sometime between approximately 3 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. In Ohio, it will last about 4 minutes for those well inside the path of totality, though weather conditions will play a major factor in visibility. Those near the edges of totality will experience a shorter period of darkness. In Columbus, there will be a partial, not total, eclipse.

The eclipse is still a sight to see even if it’s cloudy, which is possible on an April day in Ohio. Here is a video showing a total eclipse on a cloudy day in 2017.

The sky will darken and appear like it is late at night. Here’s what to expect.

For those in the path of totality, the moon will pass between the sun and the earth and block the sun, leaving a shadow, for about four minutes.

The total solar eclipse path goes through Mexico, the United States from Texas to Maine, and crosses through Canada. NASA’s website shows the exact path.

Do not look at the sun without proper eye protection. You must use special-purpose solar filter or "eclipse glasses" to safely view the eclipse. Ordinary sunglasses (even dark ones) and homemade filters are NOT safe for looking at the sun.

No, that is extremely dangerous. You must have appropriate eclipse glasses to safely view the eclipse when it is not in the path of totality.

Some parts of the university will have limited amounts of eclipse glasses for users to safely view the eclipse, but they are limited. More information about glasses is available via the American Astronomical Society.

Ohio State takes very seriously its obligation to provide the full measure of instruction to all students. Unlike K-12 schools, Ohio State does not often close because of inclement weather or one-time events. For context, in the past 50 years, the Columbus campus has canceled classes a total of 23 days.

The Office of Academic Affairs encourages faculty and instructors who teach classes during the eclipse to, if appropriate, offer flexibility to students for this once-in-a-lifetime event.

Managers and their teams should work together to create a workplan that supports doing their best work – which can include location or time flexibility during the eclipse. With manager approval, eligible employees may also consider using paid time off. Learn more about flexible work guidance for managers.

In Columbus and Newark, the eclipse will be partial and campuses will operate as usual. Lima, Mansfield, Marion and CFAES Wooster campuses are in the path of totality and will operate in a virtual and work from home environment on April 8. Visitor parking is not permitted in the residential community areas of the Mansfield and CFAES Wooster campuses.

The Office of Academic Affairs encourages faculty and instructors who teach classes during the eclipse to, if appropriate, offer flexibility to students for this once-in-a-lifetime event.

Managers and their teams should work together to create a workplan that that supports doing their best work – which can include location or time flexibility during the eclipse. With manager approval, eligible employees may also consider using paid time off. Learn more about flexible work guidance for managers.

The university has engaged with local and state public safety partners to plan for this event for all Ohio State campuses for several years. While the Columbus campus may not be in the path of totality, as with every other day of the year, we work collaboratively with units across campus and with our public safety partners to provide a safe and secure learning environment.

The regional and CFAES Wooster campuses located in the path of totality could experience major traffic and logistical increases on the day of the eclipse, and employees in those areas should prepare accordingly. The Columbus campus could also be home to traffic and tourism-related traffic.

Increased traffic is anticipated along area roadways. Motorists are encouraged to plan ahead, allow for additional travel time to access their destinations and avoid stopping along roadways to view the eclipse. Visit the Ohio Department of Transportation’s (ODOT) OHGO website or download the OHGO app to view travel-related updates, including real-time traffic conditions and information about traffic incidents throughout the state of Ohio.